An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

14963 entries, 12858 authors and 1842 subjects. Updated: April 13, 2021

Browse by Publication Year 1830–1839

364 entries
  • 4456

Résection des os.

Rev. Méd. franç, étrang., 37, 8-13, 1830.

Among the French surgeons of the 19th century, Roux was second in importance only to Dupuytren. He performed staphylorrhaphy in 1819 and sutured the ruptured female peritoneum in 1832; he is also remembered on account of his method of resection of bone.



Subjects: ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Amputations: Excisions: Resections
  • 538

De glandularum secernentium structura penitiori.

Leipzig: sumpt. L. Vossii, 1830.

Müller’s most important histological work. In it he described the microscopic anatomy of a large series of secreting glands. Müller’s greatest influence was not so much through his own work as through the influence he had upon his pupils at Bonn and Berlin. English translation, 1839.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Microscopic Anatomy (Histology)
  • 600

On a peculiar motion excited in fluids by the surfaces of certain animals.

Edinb. med. surg. J., 34, 113-22., 1830.

Sharpey was the first occupant of the chair of anatomy and physiology at University College, London, this chair being the first official recognition of physiology in any English medical school. He wrote a memorable paper on cilia and ciliary motion. Through his students Sharpey was the founder of the British school of physiology. Among his pupils were Michael Foster, Burdon-Sanderson and Edward Schäfer.



Subjects: PHYSIOLOGY
  • 4827

Zwei seltene Formen von hitzigem Rheumatismus.

Litt. Ann. ges. Heilk., 17, 22-30, 1830.

German writers usually credit Steinheim with the first description of parathyroid tetany.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Tetany
  • 2211

A treatise on fever.

London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green, 1830.

Both a doctor and a minister, Smith, physician to the London Fever Hospital, called himself, “physician to body and soul.” He argued that the poor are impoverished by fever and that fever was preventable. This book influenced Edwin Chadwick’s later achievements with the Poor Law Board, moving the ethos of public health away from the voluntary, philanthropic, individualistic eighteenth-century approach, into the imperative, community-oriented Victorian mode. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Economics, Biomedical, INFECTIOUS DISEASE, PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 1788

Liber fundamentorum pharmacologiae. Auctore Abu Mansur Mowafik ben Ali al Herui. Epitome codicis manuscripti persici Bibl. caes. reg. Vienn. inediti. Primus Latio donavit Romeo Seligmann. 2 vols.

Vienna: Antonius Nob. de Schmid, 18301833.

The most important early Persian pharmacological work, first published in print in Latin translation. Muvaffak flourished in Herat (current Afghanistan), under the Samanid prince Mansur I ibn Nuh, who ruled from 961 to 976. He was apparently the first to think of compiling a treatise on materia medica in Persian; to obtain the information he travelled extensively in Persia and India. Between 968 and 977 CE he wrote the Book of the Remedies (Kitab al-abnyia 'an Haqa'iq al-adwiya), the oldest prose work in modern Persian. It deals with 585 remedies (of which 466 are derived from plants, 75 from minerals, 44 from animals), classified into four groups according to their action. The above epitome was taken from a MS of 1055 CE, one of the oldest surviving texts in Persian. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link. A German version appeared in 1893 under the direction of R. Robert.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Afghanistan, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 1258

The nervous system of the human body. [2nd ed.]

London: Longmans, 1830.

Records Bell’s demonstration that the fifth cranial nerve has a sensory-motor function, his discovery of “Bell’s nerve” and the motor nerve of the face, lesion of which causes facial paralysis (Bell’s palsy). Bell was preceded in some of these discoveries by Mayo (No. 1390). Also includes the first description of myotonia. First edition, 1824.



Subjects: NEUROSCIENCE › NERVOUS SYSTEM › Peripheral Nerves / Nerve Impulses
  • 1456.1

Arteriarum capitis superficialium icon nova.

Berlin: J. W. Boike, 1830.

Includes description of the “canal of Schlemm”, the circular canal at the junction of the cornea and the sclerotic.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Anatomy of the Eye & Orbit
  • 2611

A short tract on the formation of tumours, and the peculiarities that are met with in the structure of those that have become cancerous; with their mode of treatment.

London: Longman, 1830.

Contains the first illustrations of microscopic sections of cancer; however, Home drew no worthwhile conclusion from his microscopic studies. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration, ANATOMY › Microscopic Anatomy (Histology), ONCOLOGY & CANCER
  • 4316

Some remarks on morbus coxarius, with an account of Dr. P. S. Physick’s method of treating this disease.

Amer. J. med. Sci., 7, 299-308, 1830.

Randolph was the son-in-law of Philip Syng Physick. Physick’s method “consisted in the application of a carved splint, which would keep the limb strictly at rest, and prevent the least possible motion of the joint; and also in the prosecution of a course of active and long continued purging”.



Subjects: ORTHOPEDICS › Diseases of or Injuries to Bones, Joints & Skeleton, ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Devices
  • 4316.1

The anatomy, physiology, and diseases of the bones and joints.

Philadelphia: John Grigg, 1830.

The first American treatise on orthopedics. In his autobiography Gross wrote that, “The title was unfortunate; it should have been A practical treatise on fractures and dislocations, with an account of the diseases of the bones and joints”.



Subjects: ORTHOPEDICS › Diseases of or Injuries to Bones, Joints & Skeleton, ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Fractures & Dislocations
  • 4166

Observations on the structure and diseases of the testis.

London: Longmans, 1830.


Subjects: UROLOGY
  • 5153

On the glanders in the human subject.

Med.-chir. Trans., 16, 171-218; 18, 201-07, 1830, 1833.

Proof that glanders in the horse is communicable to man.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Glanders
  • 5183

Hospital facts and observations.

London: Burgess & Hill, 1830.

First record (p. 149) of the use of emetine in the treatment of amoebiasis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5848

A practical treatise on diseases of the eye.

London: Longman, 1830.

In this book Mackenzie, one of the foremost ophthalmologists of his time, included a classic description of the symptomatology of glaucoma, and was probably the first to draw attention to the increase of intra-ocular pressure as a characteristic of the condition. He introduced the term “asthenopia”, and was the first to describe sympathetic ophthalmia as a distinct disease.



Subjects: OPHTHALMOLOGY › Diseases of the Eye, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Diseases of the Eye › Glaucoma
  • 6754

Medicinisches Schriftsteller-Lexicon der jetzt lebenden Aerzte, Wundärzte, Geburtschelfer, Apotheker, und Naturforscher aller gebildeten Völker. 33 vols.

Copenhagen & Altona, 18301845.

In 25 vols. and and 8-vol. supplement, Callisen’s great medical bibliography of writings by physicians, surgeons, obstetricians, pharmacists, and naturalists then living gives a complete view of the literature of the period from about 1780 to about 1830, describing over 99,000 items. As Garrison pointed out, it is one of the greatest bibliographical achievements of a single man. Reprinted, Nieuwkoop De Graaf, 1962-64.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographical Classics, NATURAL HISTORY, PHARMACOLOGY
  • 267

On some properties in achromatic object-glasses applicable to the improvement of the microscope.

Phil. Trans., 120, 187-200, 1830.

The principle of the modern microscope was worked out by Joseph Jackson Lister, father of Lord Joseph Lister. His important improvements in achromatic lenses make him one of the most prominent figures in the history of modern microscopy.



Subjects: Microscopy
  • 6952

A demonstration of the nerves of the human body.

London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green, 1830.

The largest and most splendidly produced atlas of neuroanatomy originally published in English, with plates that remain unsurpassed as works of art. Later editions were in reduced format.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy
  • 7604

Museum Brookesianum: A descriptive and historical catalogue of the remainder of the anatomical & zootomical museum, of Joshua Brookes, Esq. F.R.S. F.L.S. F.Z.S. &c.: comprising nearly one half of the original collection, and embracing an almost endless assemblage of every species of anatomical, pathological, obstetrical, and zootomical preparations, as well as subjects in natural history, of the choicest and rarest species in every department : which will be sold by auction, by Messrs. Wheatley & Adlard, at the Theatre of Anatomy, Blenheim Street, Great Marlborough Street, on Monday, the 1st of March, 1830, and 22 following evenings, (Saturdays & Sundays excepted,) at half-past six o'clock precisely

London: Printed by Richard Taylor, 1830.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , MUSEUMS › Natural History Museums / Wunderkammern
  • 7606

Catalogue of the contents of the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons of England: Parts I-II , Plants and invertebrate animals in the dried state (1860); Part III, The human and comparative osteology (1830); Part IV, Fasiculus I, Comprehending the first division of the preparations of natural history in spirit (1830); Part V, comprehending the preparations of monsters and malformed parts in spirit, and in a dried state (1831); Part VI, Comprehending the vascular and miscellaneous preparations in a dried state (1831).

London: Printed by Taylor and Francis, 18301860.

By numerous authors, many unidentified. All published. From the Preface to part I: "The present Volume... completes the series of Hunterian Catalogues. The specimens included in it consist of Plants and Invertebrate Anaimals, many of which, brought home by Cook, Banks, and White, and other voyagers, were presented to Mr. Hunter. To these is added a large collection of Corallines and Zoophytes, purchased by him at the sale of the effects of Mr. John Ellis. Numerous and valuable specimens have been obtained, both by donation and purchase, since the Collection was entrusted to the care of the Council of the College.

"Many of the lowest forms of Plants, such as the Algae and Nullipores, were the property of Mr. Ellis, and their names are still preserved in the handwriing of that genteman and of Dr. Solander."

Digital facsimile of parts I-II  from the Internet Archive at this link.  

Digital facsimile of part III from the Internet Archive at this link.

Digital facsimile of part IV, Fasciculus 1 from the Internet Archive at this link.

Digital facsimile of parts V-VI from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , MUSEUMS › Natural History Museums / Wunderkammern
  • 9150

Gunn’s domestic medicine, or poor man’s friend in the hours of affliction, pain, and sickness. This book points out, in plain language, free from doctor's terms the diseases of men, women, and children, and the latest and most approved means used in their cure, and is expressly written for the benefit of families in the western and southern states. It also contains descriptions of the medicinal roots and herbs of the western and southern country, and how they are to be used in the cure of diseases: arranged on a new and simple plan, by which the practice of medicine reduced to the principles of common sense.

Knoxville, TN: Printed under the Immediate Superintendence of the Author, a Physician of Knoxville, 1830.

Gunn intended his book to serve as a guide for frontier and rural families who lived far away from any sort of medical care so it contained instructions on how to treat a wide variety of illnesses.  While the first edition was a relatively modest 440 pages, subsequent editions ballooned to over 1000 pages that included advice on everything from the proper behavior of wives to how to cope with a child who indulges in the “solitary vice.”  Gunn’s work became well-known enough to merit a mention in both Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn, as one of the books at the Grangerford residence, and is described as, “[telling] you all about what to do if a body was sick or dead.” 

Digital facsimile of the 1835 fourth edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.) › American South, Household or Self-Help Medicine, Popularization of Medicine, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE › Tennessee
  • 9485

American conchology, or descriptions of the shells of North America illustrated from coloured figures from original drawings executed from nature. 7 parts. Parts 1–6: New Harmony, 1830–1834; Part 7: Philadelphia, 1836.

New Harmony, IN & Philadelphia: Printed at the School Press, 18301836.

The printer or publisher of part 7 is not identified. Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), NATURAL HISTORY › Illustration, ZOOLOGY › Malacology
  • 9713

Sketches of the medical topography of the Mediterranean; comprising an account of Gibraltar, the Ionian Islands, and Malta. To which is prefixed a sketch of a plan for memoirs on medical topography. By John Hennen. Edited by his son, J. Hennen.

London: Thomas and George Underwood, 1830.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Biogeography, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Gibraltar, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Greece , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Malta, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 11150

Mémoire sur l'excision de la partie inférieure du rectum, devenue carcinomateuse.

Gaz. méd. Paris, 1, 337-340, 1830.

“The first successful operation for rectal cancer was performed by Lisfranc in 1826. This consisted of excising the anus and rectum via the perineum, which resulted in the functional equivalent of a perineal colostomy” (Warren, History of Excision of the Rectum, Proc R Soc Med. 1957, 50, 599-600).

“In the pre-anesthetic era Jacques Lisfranc (1790-1847) of Paris was the first to perform a planned operation for cancer of the rectum. Lisfranc's operation was a limited excision of the lower end of the rectum from a perineal approach and was first performed in 1826. A few years later in a paper read before the Académie Royale de Médecine, he reported the results in 9 patients, 6 of whom survived and were more or less continent” (Tebala, History of colorectal surgery, Int J Colorectal Dis, 2015, 30, 723-748).



Subjects: Colon & Rectal Diseases & Surgery, ONCOLOGY & CANCER, SURGERY: General › Surgical Oncology
  • 11452

Organisation, Systematik und geographische Verhältniss der Infusionsthierchen. Zwei Vorträge, in der Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin gehalten in den Jahren 1828 und 1830.

Berlin: Druckerei der Königlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften , 1830.

In this work Ehrenberg first published his classification of infusioria, including the naming of bacteria for the first time. The work published two papers based on his expeditions. The first, read on January 10, 1828, was "Die geographische Verbreitung der Infusionsthierschen in Nord-Afrika und West-Asien, bebachtet auf Hemprich und Enrenbergs Reisen". This was the work in which Ehrenberg first published his classification of infusoria, and named bacteria. In it he set out his findings from travels through north Africa and Arabia in 1820-1825, during which he accumulated some 34,000 zoological and 46,000 botanical specimens. Considering the enormous amount of material accumulated, it must have taken Ehrenberg a few years to organize and summarize some of the findings.

Ehrenberg's second paper, read on March 4 and 18, 1830, was "Beiträge zur Kenntniss der Organisation der Infusorien und ihrer geographischen Verbreitung, besonders in Sibirien." In this lectures he recounted findings during his travels through Russia, which were patronized by Alexander von Humboldt, and financed by Czar Nicholas I.

Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › Bacteria, Classification of, MICROBIOLOGY, Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientsts, ZOOLOGY › Protistology (formerly Protozoology)
  • 11604

On the diseases and injuries of arteries, with the operations required for their cure.

London: Burgess and Hill & Dublin: Maclachlan & Stewart, 1830.

"Guthrie's experiences during the Peinsular War enabled him to make considerable improvements in practical surgery. These included introducing the practice of ligaturing both ends of a divided artery.... Guthrie made further surgical advances after Waterloo, where he successfully divided the muscles of the calf to tie the main artery" (ODNB 24, 305).

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Napoleon's Campaigns & Wars, VASCULAR SURGERY, VASCULAR SURGERY › Ligations
  • 11605

Researches principally relative to the morbid and curative effects of loss of blood.

London: L. B. Seeley and Sons, 1830.

Hall's experiments on the physiological effects of therapeutic bleeding provided compelling evidence that bleeding could cause significant harm and even death. Digital facsimile from wellcomecollection.org at this link.



Subjects: THERAPEUTICS › Bloodletting
  • 12104

Essay on superstition; being an inquiry into the effects of physical influence on the mind, in the production of dreams, visions, ghosts, and other supernatural appearances.

London: J. Hatchard & Son, 1830.

In this conceptual anticipation of later ideas in psychopharmacology Newnham argued that dreams, visions, apparitions and other apparently spiritual manifestations, whether good or bad, arose from physiological rather than supernatural causes. He provided evidence that the effects on the brain from disease, medications (including nitrous oxide and opium) and trauma, causing "disturbance of brainular function", could produce such experiences. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › Psychopharmacology, PSYCHOLOGY, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 12445

The philosophy of sleep.

Glasgow: W. R. M'Phun, 1830.

An early attempt at a comprehensive analysis of sleep from the medical point of view, including topics such as "Night-Mare", "Day-Mare", "Sleep-Walking," Sleep-Talking," Sleeplessness, Waking Dreams, Drowiness, Trance, etc.
Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Sleep Physiology & Medicine
  • 12481

The Botanic physician: Being a compendium of the practice of physic, upon botanical principles, containing all the principal branches necessary to the study of medicine, as anatomy; physiology; surgery; causes, symptoms and cure of diseases; midwifery; materia medica; pharmacy, botany, &c. Together with a great variety of useful recipes.

New York: Murphy & Bingham, 1830.

“The first treatise to attempt a scientific synthesis of the botanic practice....The first significant attempt to synthesize and systematize the prevailing botanic practice and plant materia medica” (Berman & Flannery, America's botanico-medical movements (2001) 46-49, 72, 73)

Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Medical Botany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 13201

Essay on superstition; being an inquiry into the effects of physical influence on the mind, in the production of dreams, visions, ghosts, and other supernatural appearances.

London: J. Hatchard & Son, 1830.

Newnham argued that argued that apparitional experiences, dreams and spiritual visions had a physiological rather than a supernatural basis. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 4457

Treatise on the excision of diseased joints.

Edinburgh: A. Black, 1831.

Syme, teacher and father-in-law of Lister, was one of the greatest of the Scottish surgeons. He is remembered for his method of amputation at the ankle (see No. 4459), for his speedy adoption of anesthesia and antisepsis, and for the above book, which showed that excision of joints is usually preferable to amputation – a principle soon generally adopted.



Subjects: ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Amputations: Excisions: Resections
  • 4493

On a new practice in acute and chronic rheumatism.

Amer. J. med. Sci., 8, 55-64, 1831.

First description of the neurotic spinal arthropathies.



Subjects: RHEUMATOLOGY
  • 4828

Observations sur une espèce de tétanos intermittent.

Arch. gén. Méd., 26, 190-205, 1831.

Dance’s important early description of parathyroid tetany followed closely on that of Steinheim.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Tetany
  • 768.1

A critical and experimental essay on the circulation of the blood.

London: R. B. Seeley & W. Burnside, 1831.

Marshall Hall clearly distinguished arterioles and venules from capillaries, and he described arteriovenous shunts.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY › Anatomy of the Heart & Circulatory System, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY › Cardiovascular System
  • 534.59

Lehrbuch der pathologischen Anatomie der Haus-Saugethiere. 3 vols.

Berlin: G. Reimer, 18311849.

The most comprehensive treatise on malformations of domesticated animals, as well as an important contribution to general teratology. The superb atlas illustrates many rare animal terata. See also his Uber thierische Missgeburten, ein Beitrag zur pathologischen Anatomie und Entwicklungsgeschichte. Berlin, A. Hirschwald, 1877. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: TERATOLOGY, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 1259

Bestätigung des Bell’schen Lehrsatzes, das die doppelten Wurzeln der Rückenmarksnerven verschiedene Fuctionen haben, durch neue und Entscheidende Experimente.

[Froriep’s] Notiz. a. d. Geb. d. Natur- u. Heilk., 30, 113-117, 129-34, 1831.

Experimental proof of the Bell-Magendie law (see Nos. 1254 & 1256) of the spinal nerve roots.



Subjects: NEUROSCIENCE › NERVOUS SYSTEM › Peripheral Nerves / Nerve Impulses, NEUROSCIENCE › Neurophysiology
  • 1851
  • 5649

Recherches sur quelques combinaisons du chlore.

Ann. Chim. (Paris), 2e sér., 48, 113, 57, 1831.

Soubeiran, like Liebig and Guthrie, discovered chloroform; it is difficult to determine who was first, as each may have allowed an interval of time to elapse between discovery and publication.



Subjects: ANESTHESIA › Chloroform
  • 2123

The effects of the principal arts, trades and professions, and of civic states and habits of living on health and longevity.

London: Longman, 1831.

The first systematic publication in Great Britain on industrial disease and its prevention. For comprehensiveness, first-hand clinical experience and constructive proposals for improvements, Thackrah’s monograph is superior to that of Ramazzini. It attracted attention from both medical men and laymen at the time that it appeared, and played an important part in stimulating the factory and health legislation which mitigated some of the worst features of the Industrial Revolution. The book also includes important information on the harmful effects of child labor. The second edition (1832) was doubled in length. A reprint of the 2nd edition, with a life of the author by A. Meiklejohn, was published in 1957.



Subjects: Economics, Biomedical, OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE , PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 200

Über den Zwischenkiefer des Menschen und der Thiere von Goethe. Jena, 1786. Mit 5 Kupfertafeln.

Nova Acta Acad. Leopold.-Carol. (Halle), 15, 1-48., 1831.

Goethe believed that in 1784 he demonstrated the presence of the intermaxillary (premaxillary) bone in man, proving an anatomical connection between man and the lower animals. He was one of the pioneers of evolution and the first to use the term “morphology”. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link. See George A. Wells, "Goethe and the intermaxillary bone," British Journal for the History of Science, 3 (1967) 348-61. (Available from JSTOR at this link.)



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, EVOLUTION
  • 216.3

On naval timber and arboriculture.

London: Longman, 1831.

The “first clear and complete” anticipation of the Darwinian theory of evolution by natural selection. The appendix to Matthew’s work actually uses the expression, “natural process of selection”. See W.J. Dempster, Patrick Matthew and natural selection: A nineteenth century gentleman-farmer, naturalist and writer, Edinburgh, Paul Harris, 1983.



Subjects: BOTANY, EVOLUTION
  • 2584

Hay fever.

Lond. med. Gaz., , 8, 411-16; 12, 164-71., 1831, 18321833.

Elliotson was the first to ascertain that pollen was the cause of hay fever.

 



Subjects: ALLERGY
  • 2977

Mémoire sur la piqûre ou l’acupuncture des artères dans le traitement des anévrismes.

Gaz. méd. Paris, 2, 1-4, 1831.

First attempt at operative treatment of aneurysm.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Aneurysms
  • 4317

De la rétraction des doigts par suite d’une affection de l’aponévrose palmaire, opération chirurgicale qui convient dans ce cas.

J. univ. hebd. Méd. Chir. prat., 2 sér., 5, 352-65., 1831.

Dupuytren devised an operation for the treatment of contracture of the palmar fascia (“Dupuytren’s contracture”). Reprinted, with translation, in Med. Classics, 1939, 4, 127-50. The condition was first mentioned by Platter, No. 4297.9.



Subjects: ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Hand / Wrist, PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY › Hand, Surgery of
  • 6358.1

Merkwürdige Fragilität der Knochen ohne dyskrasische Ursache als krankhafte Eigenthümlichkeit dreier Geschwister.

Ann ges. Heilk (Karlsruhe), 4, 58-68, 1831.

Axmann of Wertheim described osteogenesis imperfecta occurring in himself and his two brothers. He referred to the occurrence of articular dislocations and blue sclerotics. See also No. 6367.



Subjects: GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Hereditary Disorders of the Skeleton › Osteogenesis Imperfecta, ORTHOPEDICS › Diseases of or Injuries to Bones, Joints & Skeleton › Congenital Diseases
  • 7246

Traité complet de l'anatomie de l'homme, comprenant la médecine opératoire. 16 vols.

Paris: C.-A. Delaunay, 18311854.

With over 2000 pages of text and 726 lithographed plates (incorporating 3604 individual figures), this work is the most comprehensive, and perhaps the most beautiful anatomical surgical atlas of the 19th century. It was published in parts over 23 years and represented the life work of Bourgery, who died before completion. Some copies were issued with the plates in black and white at half the price of the colored copies. The black and white images lack much of the visual drama of the hand-colored plates.

The artist who directed the massive program of prosection, and who was responsible for 512 of the spectacular illustrations, was Nicholas-Henri Jacob, a student of the neo-classical painter of the French Revolution, Jacques-Louis David. Bourgery considered Jacob his full collaborator in the project. The influence of the highly finished style of David is evident in the plates for this work. Before embarking on this project Jacob had gained considerable experience drawing on stone for lithographic publications. Jacob's artistic collaborators on the project were his wife, Charlotte Hublier-Jacob, Lean Baptiste Leveillé, Edmond Pochet, E. Roussin, and others. The physiologist Claude Bernard did dissections and anatomical preparations for only two of the images and a few captions. Bernard played a somewhat greater editorial role in the slightly expanded second edition published from 1866 to 1871. For both versions the precisely-detailed hand-coloring was done by an elaborate system of stencils; otherwise the time involved in the intricate hand-coloring of all the large plates might have made the edition impossible.

The first two volumes were translated into English and issued in Paris by Delaunay in 1833 and 1837. Before this English edition was terminated the publisher also issued a fragment of volume 4. Presumably only a small number of copies of the English version were issued, as relatively few have survived as compared to the original French edition.

All the plates were reproduced in color in a modern single-volume tri-lingual folio edition: Bourgery et Jacob, Atlas of human anatomy and surgery, edited by Jean Marie Le Minor and Henri Sick (Cologne: Taschen, 2005).

 

 



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration, ART & Medicine & Biology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France
  • 7741

Icones selectae praeparatiorum Musei Anatomici Universitatis Fridericiae Wilhelmiae Rhenanae.

Bonn: Adolph Marcus, 1831.

Discussion of various specimens in the anatomical museum of  Medical Faculty of the Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Bonn, highlighting a number of embryological, teratological and obstetrical items, some of which are illustrated. Digital facsimile from Universität Bonn at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 9354

Traité des maladies cutanées des pieds, telles que cors, oignon, durillons, verrues, ongles, etc.

Toulouse: Imprimerie de J.-M. Corne, 1831.

Probably the first book specifically on the skin diseases of the feet, including the functions and nature of the skin of the feet and the manner in which perspiration takes place in the feet. Nothing is known regarding the author; even his first name is unknown. He may have been an army surgeon as he pays particular attention to the feet of soldiers.  Digital facsimile of the 1845 second edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY, Podiatry
  • 9490

Iseki kō. (I Chi Kao). 8 vols.

Tokyo, 1831.

A comprehensive annotated bibliography in Japanese of Chinese medical literature, including materia medica. The bibliography includes works for which the author had references, but could not locate copies. According to Lu & Needham, Taki's work was finished c. 1825, first printed in 1831, reprinted in Tokyo in 1933-35, and reprinted in Shanghai, 1936. There was also a reprint in Beijing in 1956. Limited (search only) access  to the 1933-35 reprint from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY , Chinese Medicine , Chinese Medicine › History of Chinese Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 9679

Medical botany: Or, illustrations of the medicinal plants of the London, Edinburgh, and Dublin pharmacopoeias; comprising a popular and scientific account of those poisonous vegetables that are indigenous to Great Britain. 4 vols.

London: John Churchill, 1831.

Includes 185 hand-colored plates. Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, TOXICOLOGY
  • 9807

Beredeneerde beschrijving van het Museum Anatomico-Physiologicum van P. de Riemer.

Rotterdam: Weduwe J. Allart, 1831.

Digital facsimile from Universiteit Utrecht at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Cross-Sectional, MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 9954

Traité des exhumations juridiques, et considérations sur les changemens physiques que les cadavres éprouvent en sepourrissant dans la terre, dans l’eau, dans les fosses d’aisance etdans le fumier. 2 vols.

Paris: Béchet jeune, 1831.

The first book devoted entirely to exhumation and decomposition of bodies. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine)
  • 9995

Anatomy. Copy of a letter from the council of the Royal College of Surgeons in London, to Viscount Melbourne.

London, 1831.

On December 5, 1831, the notorious London "resurrection men" John Bishop and Thomas Williams were executed for the murder of an itinerant fourteen-year-old (known only as the "Italian Boy"), whose corpse they had then attempted to sell to the anatomical demonstrator at King's College. Five days later, the Council of the Royal College of Surgeons-whose members included such luminaries as Astley Cooper, William Lawrence, Benjamin Collins Brodie, Charles Bell and Benjamin Travers-sent the present letter to Viscount Melbourne, the British Home Secretary, urging reform of the antiquated British laws governing procurement and possession of cadavers for dissection in medical schools. 

Since the mid-eighteenth century, obtaining cadavers for teaching purposes had been regulated in Britain by the Murder Act of 1752, which stipulated that only the corpses of executed criminals could be used for dissection. By the beginning of the nineteenth century, however, improvements in medical science, coupled with a substantial drop in the number of executions, caused the demand for cadavers to far outstrip the legal supply. This situation was ripe for exploitation by "resurrection men," criminals who robbed the graves of the newly deceased and sold their corpses to teachers of anatomy, who of necessity turned a blind eye to the illegality of these transactions. Some grave-robbers even resorted to murder, including the infamous William Burke, who in 1828 was tried and executed in Edinburgh for the murders of over a dozen victims whose corpses he and his partner Hare sold to an anatomical demonstrator connected to Edinburgh University.

Calls for reform of the 1752 Murder Act began to arise as early as 1810, and in 1828, the year of Burke's execution, Parliament appointed a select committee to "enquire into the manner of obtaining subjects for dissection by schools of Anatomy and the State of law affecting persons employed in obtaining and dissecting bodies." The horrific nature of the crimes committed by Burke, Bishop and Williams aroused public sentiment in favor of reform, a sentiment echoed in the present letter from the RCS Council, which spells out in detail the untenable position of students and teachers of anatomy under the then-current law. In 1832 Parliament passed the Anatomy Act, granting licenses to teachers of anatomy and giving physicians, surgeons and medical students legal access to corpses unclaimed after death. Digital facsimile of the reproduction of the "letter" in The Lancet from Google Books at this link



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences › Legislation, Biomedical
  • 10441

Circular of the Philadelphia Museum: Containing directions for the preparation and preservation of objects of natural history.

Philadelphia: Printed by James Kay, Jun. & Co., 1831.


Subjects: MUSEUMS › Natural History Museums / Wunderkammern, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE › Pennsylvania
  • 10790

A practical medico-historical account of the western coast of Africa: Embracing a topographical description of its shores, rivers, and settlements, with their seasons and comparative healthiness: Together with the causes, symptoms, and treatment, of the fevers of western Africa, and a similar account respecting the other diseases which prevail there.

London: S. Highley, 1831.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Africa, TROPICAL Medicine , Topography, Medical, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 11759

Report of the Select Committee of the House of Representatives ... legalizing the study of anatomy.

Boston: Dutton & Wentworth, Printers, 1831.

This was the first law passed in the United States consigning the bodies of those who died in workhouses, hospitals, and similar institutions, the bodies of whom were "unclaimed," to medical schools for dissection. "Such measures assured the 'respectable' classes that their graves would not be plundered to provision the dissecting table, while providing anatomists with a steady suppply of free cadavers, and rescuing the profession from the taint of association with unsavory lower-class body snatchers...." (Sappol, A traffic in dead bodies, 4). John Collins Warren spearheaded the effort to get this legislation passed.

Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences › Legislation, Biomedical, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE › Massachusetts
  • 11765

Narrative of a voyage to the Pacific and Beering's strait, to co-operate with the polar expeditions: Performed in His Majesty's Ship Blossom, under the command of Captain F. W. Beechey ... in the years 1825, 26, 27, 28.

London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley, 1831.

Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 12025

Catalogue of the library of the Royal College of Surgeons in London.

London: Printed by Richard Taylor, 1831.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Institutional Medical Libraries
  • 12346

Die Lehre vom Kreislauf vom Harvey. Eine historische Abhandlungen.

Berlin: Friedrich August Herbig, 1831.

Perhaps the earliest essay by a professional historian on the pre-Harveian history of the circulation. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › History of Cardiology, PHYSIOLOGY › History of Physiology
  • 12797

Ornithological biography, or an account of the habits of the birds of the United States of America; accompanied by descriptions of the objects represented in the work entitled The Birds of America, and interspersed with delineations of American scenery and manners. 5 vols.

Edinburgh: Adam Black, 18311839.

This was the text for Aububon's The birds of America. Audubon wrote it with the assistance of William Macgillivray, though he did not credit him on the title page. The text included Audubon's accounts of his travels and adventures in America scattered through the volumes in the bird descriptions, and as separate anecdotes. Audubon recounted his experiences in the Florida Keys, along the Mississippi, and in Louisiana and Kentucky in the 1820s and 1830s.

Audubon published the text separately from the double elephant folio plates in order to avoid a stricture of the British Copyright Act of 1709 which would have required him to deposit a set of the very expensive double elephant folio plates with each of nine depository libraries in the United Kingdom.

Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists, ZOOLOGY › Ornithology
  • 12865

A practical guide to operations on the teeth. To which is prefixed a historical sketch of the rise and progress of dental surgery.

London: John Wilson, 1831.

In this work Snell described and illustrated his "operating chair," the first reclining dental chair with adjustable headrest. The chair also had a convenient mirror mounted on one of the arms for the patient to look at his own teeth. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: DENTISTRY, DENTISTRY › Dental Instruments & Apparatus
  • 325

Memoir on the pearly nautilus (Nautilus pompilius, Linn.).

London: W. Wood & Co., 1832.


Subjects: BIOLOGY, BIOLOGY › Marine Biology, COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, ZOOLOGY › Illustration, ZOOLOGY › Malacology
  • 672

Neues eigenthümliches stickstoffhaltiges Princip, in Muskelfleisch gefunden.

J. Chem. Physik., 65, 455-56., 1832.

Isolation of creatine from muscle.



Subjects: BIOCHEMISTRY
  • 1558

On the form and structure of the membrana tympani.

Lond. med. Gaz., 10, 120-24, 1832.

Description of the pars flaccida (“Shrapnell’s membrane”) of the tympanic membrane.



Subjects: OTOLOGY › Anatomy of the Ear, OTOLOGY › Physiology of Hearing
  • 1119

The anatomy of the thymus gland.

London: Longman, 1832.

Cooper, the most popular surgeon in London during the early part of the 19th century, was connected with both Guy’s and St. Thomas’s Hospitals. Among his best works is his description of the thymus; he described the “reservoir” of the thymus as lined by smooth mucous membrane and running spirally, not straight, through the gland.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, Ductless Glands: Internal Secretion
  • 480

Abhandlungen zur Bildungs-und Entwicklungs-Geschichte der Menschen und der Thiere. 2 pts.

Leipzig: F. C. W. Vogel, 18321833.

Rathke’s most notable discovery was of structures homologous with gill slits in bird and mammalian embryos. He discredited the vertebral theory of the skull.



Subjects: EMBRYOLOGY, ZOOLOGY › Ornithology
  • 534.58

Histoire générale et particulière des anomalies de l’organisation chez l’homme et les animaux. 3 vols. and atlas.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 18321837.

Isidore, the son of Étienne (See No. 534.57) organized all known human and animal malformations taxonomically. Many principles governing abnormal development were enunciated for the first time in this work. It also introduced hundreds of names for specific malformations, many of which are still in use. For comprehensive coverage of rare anomalies it is still of value as a reference source.



Subjects: TERATOLOGY
  • 1850
  • 5648

New mode of preparing a spirituous solution of chloric ether.

Amer. J. Sci. Arts, 21, 64-65; 22, 105-06, 1832.

Guthrie in America, Liebig in Germany, and Soubeiran in France discovered chloroform independently of one another. Guthrie discovered the modern method of making chloroform by distilling alcohol with chlorinated lime. The second paper has the title: On pure chloric ether.



Subjects: ANESTHESIA › Chloroform
  • 1852
  • 5650

Ueber die Verbindungen, welche durch die Einwirkung des Chlors auf Alkohol, Aether, ölbildenes Gas und Essiggeist entstehen.

Ann. Pharm. (Heidelberg), 1, 182-230, 1832.

Discovery, in 1831, of chloroform and chloral. Independently chloroform was discovered by Souberian and by Guthrie.



Subjects: ANESTHESIA › Chloroform, Chemistry
  • 1853

Nouvelles observations sur les principaux produits de l’opium.

Ann. Chim. (Paris), 2e sér. 51, 225-67, 1832.

Isolation of codeine.



Subjects: ANESTHESIA › Opiates, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Opium › Codeine
  • 1496

On a new membrane in the eye.

Hull, England: I. Wilson, 1832.

“Fielding’s membrane”, the tapetum of the retina.



Subjects: OPHTHALMOLOGY › Anatomy of the Eye & Orbit
  • 3113

Sur les maladies chlorotiques et sur un mode de traitement spécifique dans ces affections.

Rev. méd. franç. étrang., 45, 337-67., 1832.

For the treatment of chlorosis Blaud prescribed a pill (Blaud’s pill) composed of sulphate of iron and carbonate of potassium. Preliminary report in Bull. gén. Thérap.,1832, 2,154-55.



Subjects: HEMATOLOGY › Anemia & Chlorosis
  • 3114

Die krankhafte Mischung des Blutes, vorzüglich bei Chlorose, Hysterie und Pneumonie, durch chemische Versuche ausgemittelt, und der Uebergang in den Darmcanal eingebrachten Eisens.

Allg. med. Ztg., No. 97, col. 1537., 1832.

Foedisch showed chlorotic blood to be deficient in iron. See also Gaz. médParis, 1837, 2 sér. 5,7.



Subjects: HEMATOLOGY › Anemia & Chlorosis
  • 3615

Cases and observations connected with disease of the pancreas and duodenum.

Med.-chir. Trans., 18, 1-56, 1832.


Subjects: HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Gallbladder, Biliary Tract, & Pancreas
  • 2747

A treatise on the diseases of the heart and great vessels.

London: W. Kidd, 1832.

Hope did much to advance the knowledge of heart murmurs, valvular disease, and aneurysm; he described the second sound of the left side of the sternum in mitral stenosis as “altered” – losing its short, flat clear sound and becoming a prolonged bellows murmur. From his description this became known as “Hope’s early diastolic murmur.” His classic descriptions of cardiac asthma, valvular disease (pp. 307-45 above), and cardiac neurosis are reprinted in Willius & Keys, Cardiac classics, 1941, pp. 405-15. Probably published in 1831 (see review in Lond. med. phys. J., 1831, p. 513-22 (Dec.)) although “all known copies seem to have cancel title page dated 1832” (Wellcome Catalogue).



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Aneurysms, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Heart Failure › Cardiac Asthma, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Heart Valve Disease
  • 2748

On permanent patency of the mouth of the aorta, or inadequacy of the aortic valves.

Edinburgh Medical & Surgical Journal, 37, 225-45, 1832.

In his wonderfully clear account of aortic insufficiency, Corrigan described the “water-hammer pulse” now commonly known as “Corrigan’s pulse.” He recognized that the hypertrophy of the heart present in this condition is compensatory and not a disease. Corrigan was the last of the famous band forming the “Irish School of Medicine” in the 19th century. Reprinted in Med. Classics, 1937, 1, 703-27.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Aortic Diseases
  • 3762

On some morbid appearances of the absorbent glands and spleen.

Med.-chir. Trans., 17, 68-114, 1832.

First full description of lymphadenoma, which Wilks in 1865 referred to as “Hodgkin’s disease”. This is more typically designated as Hodgkin's lymphoma. In 1666 Malpighi had vaguely outlined the condition. Hodgkin was pathologist at Guy’s Hospital. The paper is reproduced in Med. Classics, 1937, 1, 741-70.



Subjects: ONCOLOGY & CANCER › Lymphoma, Spleen: Lymphatics
  • 2748.1

Physiologisch-chirurgische Beobachtungen bei Cholera-Kranken.

Cholera-Archiv mit Benutzung amtlicher Quellen, 1, Heft 1, 86-105, 1832.

First recorded example of cardiac catheterization, performed during an unsuccessful attempt to obtain blood from a patient suffering from cholera (p. 100). Second edition as separate pamphlet with a new Foreward, Güstrow, 1834. Digital facsimile of the 1834 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › Interventional Cardiology › Cardiac Catheterization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 3990.1

Monographie des dermatoses.

Paris: Daynac, 1832.

This includes the first published illustration of Alibert’s famous “family tree” for the classification of skin diseases, a concept which Alibert borrowed freely from Torti (No. 5231). This classification was never widely adopted. The book contains an important description of dermatolysis.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY, GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Congenital Skin Disorders › Cutis Laxa (Dermatolysis)
  • 5105

Suggestions respecting the cause, nature, and treatment of cholera.

Lond. med. surg. J., n.s. 2, 151-53, 1832.

Parkin suggested the water-born character of cholera and the use of charcoal filters for water purification.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 2247
  • 5590

Leçons orales de clinique chirurgicale. 4 vols.

Paris: Germer Baillière, 18321834.

Dupuytren was born in poverty and died a millionaire. He became the best surgeon of his time in France. He was a “shrewd diagnostician, an operator of unrivaled aplomb, a wonderful clinical teacher, and a good experimental physiologist and pathologist” (Garrison); his greatest contributions were in the field of surgical pathology. Vol. 1, p. 424 contains Dupuytren's classification of burns. English translation by A. S. Doane, Boston, 1833.



Subjects: Diseases Due to Physical Factors › Burns, PATHOLOGY, SURGERY: General
  • 5592

Nouveaux éléments de médecine opératoire. 3 vols. and atlas

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1832.

In its time this was the most comprehensive work on operative surgery in France; it contains some useful historical information. The first English translation appeared in New York, 1835. The atlas for that edition was never published. The best edition was the English translation annotated and significantly expanded by Valentine Mott (1785-1865), 3 vols. and atlas, New York, 1845-47.



Subjects: SURGERY: General
  • 6516

Die Tanzwuth, eine Volkskrankheit im Mittelalter.

Berlin: T.C.F. Enslin, 1832.

A study of the dancing mania of the Middle Ages. An English translation (see No. 1678) appeared in 1835.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 6800

A dictionary of practical medicine. 3 vols.

London: Longman, 18321858.


Subjects: Dictionaries, Biomedical › Lexicography, Biomedical
  • 7036

Fruits of philosophy, or the private companion of young married people,

Boston, MA: [Publisher not identified], 1832.

First edition published privately and anonymously. Second edition, with additions, Boston, 1833. Many times reprinted. Republished by Charles Bradlaugh and Annie Besant, 1891. Edited, with an introductory notice by Norman E. Himes, and with "medical emendations" by Robert Latou Dickinson (1937). Digital facsimile of the 1891 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.  See Michael Sappol, "Anatomical Performance, Medical Narrative, and Identity in Antebellum America," Bull. Hist. Med., 83 (2009) 460-49, which primarily concerns the life of Knowlton through the examination of his autobiography.



Subjects: Contraception , SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 7688

A treatise on epidemic cholera; including an historical account of its origin and progress, to the present period. Compiled from the most authentic sources.

Hartford, CT: H. and F. J. Huntington, 1832.

This compendium contains one of the first world charts of a disease, tracing the spread of cholera from two main sources, India (1817) and China (1820), across Asia and the Middle East via trade routes, to France and England in 1832, from which it spread to North America. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Cartography, Medical & Biological, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 7773

A manual of the ornithology of the United States and of Canada. Vol. 1: The land birds. Vol. 2: The water birds.

Cambridge, MA: Hilliard & Brown, 18321834.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), NATURAL HISTORY, ZOOLOGY › Ornithology
  • 8630

Practical essays on medical education, and the medical profession, in the United States.

Cincinnati, OH: Roff & Young, 1832.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.) › American Midwest, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE › Ohio
  • 8806

Clinical illustrations of the more important diseases of Bengal, with the result of an inquiry into their pathology and treatment.

Calcutta: Printed at the Baptist Mission Press, 1832.

Digital facsimile from the Medical Heritage Library, Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, Geography of Disease / Health Geography, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in
  • 8951

Aeliani de natura animalium libri septemdecim. Verba ad fidem librorum manuscriptorum constituit et annotationibus illustravit Fridericus Jacobs.

Jena: Frederic Frommann, 1832.

The first modern critical edition of the text, which collated medieval manuscripts against the previous printed editions. Digital facsimile of the 1832 edition from the Internet Archive at this link



Subjects: NATURAL HISTORY › Late Antiquity, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy, Zoology, Natural History, Ancient Greek / Roman / Egyptian
  • 9680

Medical zoology, and mineralogy; or, illustrations and descriptions of the animals and minerals employed in medicine and of the preparations derived from them: Including also an account of animal and mineral poisons: With figures coloured from nature.

London: John Wilson, 1832.

Includes 42 hand-colored plates. Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS, TOXICOLOGY, TOXICOLOGY › Zootoxicology, ZOOLOGY
  • 9993

Anatomy. Proceedings at the National Political Union, respecting legislative interference in the study of anatomy, and the supply of bodies for anatomical research.

London: Barnes, Printer, 1832.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences › Legislation, Biomedical
  • 10393

Code administratif des établissemens dangereux, insalubres ou incommodes.

Paris: Béchet jeune, 1832.

Trebuchet's work sets out the rules and regulations governing dangerous and unhealthy work environments (particularly those involving steam engines) and public nuisances. Pages 281-301 contain a table of businesses classed by their products, listing their specific offenses against public health and citing the laws governing their activities. As far as we have been able to determine, Trebuchet’s work was far more comprehensive than any individual book published in the English language at this time. 

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences, OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE
  • 10395

The moral and physical condition of the working classes employed in the cotton manufacture in Manchester. By James Phillips Kay.

London: James Ridgway, 1832.

"At first engaged in a Rochdale bank, in 1824 he [Kay-Shuttleworth] became a medical student at the University of Edinburgh. Settling in Manchester about 1827, he was instrumental in setting up the Manchester Statistical Society. He worked for the Ardwick and Ancoats Dispensary. While still known simply as Dr. James Kay, he wrote The Moral and Physical Condition of the Working Class Employed in the Cotton Manufacture in Manchester (1832), which was cited by Friedrich Engels in Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844. The experience which he thus gained of the conditions of the poor in the Lancashire factory districts, together with his interest in economic science, led to his appointment in 1835 as poor law commissioner in Norfolk and Suffolk and later in the London districts. In 1839 he was appointed first secretary of the committee formed by the Privy Council to administer the Government grant for the public education in Britain" (Wikipedia). Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE , PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 10457

Relation historique et médicale du choléra-morbus de Pologne, comprenant l'apparition de la maladie, sa march, ses progrès, ses symptômes, son mode de traitement et les moyens préservatifs. Avec une carte.

Paris: Germer Baillière, 1832.

In his study of the spread of cholera in Poland in 1831 Brière de Boismont used a map to show the progression of the disease from a central point through the country along a red line through principal towns and the date in which the disease appeared in each town. Digital facsimile from BnF Gallica at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Poland, Cartography, Medical & Biological, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 10462

The substance of the official medical reports upon the epidemic, called cholera: Which prevailed among the poor at Dantzick, between the end of May and the first part of September, 1831, as transmitted to their lordships; being an analysis of the said epidemic disease in that city--founded upon actual observation and accurate inquiry: With important and well-authenticated facts relative to the same disease, as it prevailed among the poor in other parts of the North of Europe.

London: S. Highley, 1832.

Hamett privately published this report after it was rejected for publication by the British government. He included hospital admission tables in his book and produced perhaps the first map based on hospital reports of disease incidence. He identified clusters of hospital-certified cholera that originated in "close, low and dirty alleys or places in which the air is penned up" (p. 132).  Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Poland, Cartography, Medical & Biological, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 10463

A treatise on the epidemic cholera, as it has prevailed in India; together with the reports of the medical officers, made to the medical boards of the presidencies of Bengal, Madras, and Bombay, for the purpose of ascertaining a successful mode of treating that destructive disease; And a critical examination of all the works that have hitherto appeared on the subject.

Calcutta: Printed at the Baptist Mission Press & Wm. Thacker & Co., 1832.

Corbyn mapped the history of cholera in India within British regimental stations. He included the date of each reported outbreak in a table of British regimental locations to describe the temporal progression of the disease. His map shows routes connecting British garrisons within the landscape of Indian towns and cities. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, Cartography, Medical & Biological, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 10526

A geographical and statistical account of the epidemic cholera: From its commencement in India to its entrance into the United States: Comprehended in a series of maps and tables, exhibiting the names of places visited by the pestilence, the time of its commencement, the number of cases, and deaths, and duration, at each place: Compiled from a great variety of printed and manuscript documents.

Philadelphia: Published by the Author, 1832.

Tanner, a prolific cartographer, wished to provide a geographic account of the spread of the worldwide cholera epidemic of 1817.  Statistics concerning the epidemic, he complained, were "given in such a loose and unconnected manner as to render a reference to them at once irksome and unprofitable." His publication included global, national and local maps, data tables showing number of deaths in different localities by country, and detailed maps of the United States and New York City with small red dots indicating points where the disease had broken out. Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link unfortunately does not include the maps.



Subjects: Cartography, Medical & Biological, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 10812

Observations on the epidemic now prevailing in the city of New-York; called the Asiatic or spasmodic cholera; with advice to the planters of the South, for the medical treatment of their slaves.

New York: Printed by George P. Scott and Co., 1832.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.) › American Northeast, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.) › American South, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera, Slavery and Medicine
  • 11642

Outlines of the geographical distribution of British plants; belonging to the division of vasculares or cotyledones.

Edinburgh: Printed for Private Distribution, 1832.

“Watson's major botanical endeavour was producing several versions of a work first entitled Outlines of the Geographical Distribution of British Plants (1832); it reached its most extensive form as Cybele Britannica, or, British Plants, and their Geographical Relations (4 vols., 1847–59). Volume four contains his most detailed phytogeographical conclusions. After publishing several supplements, he summarized his data in Topographical Botany: being Local and Personal Records towards shewing the Distribution of British Plants (2 vols., 1873–4). He was working on a second edition of it when he died; it was completed by John G. Baker and William W. Newbould (1883)” (ODNB).

Digital facsimile of the 1832 edition from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, Biogeography › Phytogeography
  • 12197

On the influence of physical agents on life, by W. F. Edwards. Translated from the French by Dr. Hodgkin and Dr. Fisher. To which are added, in the appendix, some observations on electricity by Dr. Edwards, M. Pouillet, and Luke Howard; on absorption, and the uses of the spleen, by Dr. Hodgkin; on the microscopic characters of the animal tissues and fluids, by J. J. Lister and Dr. Hodgkin, and some notes to the work of Dr. Edwards.

London: S. Highley, 1832.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment, PHYSIOLOGY, PHYSIOLOGY › Environmental Physiology
  • 12667

The Aphorisms of Hippocrates, translated into Arabic by Honain ben Ishak, physician to the Caliph Motawukkul. [Edited from two MSS. by J. Tytler, assisted by Mawlavis Sulaymān, Ghulām Makhdūm, and ʿAbd Allāh.].

Calcutta: Education Press, 1832.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12745

Encyclographie des sciences médicales. Réimpression générale des ouvrages periodiques sur ces sciences, publies en France.

Brussels: Établissement Encyclographique, 18321854.

From 1845 to 1854 this enigmatically titled work was pubished under the title, Nouvelle encyclographie des sciences médicales.  Rather than an encyclopedia, it was a series of reprints of books and periodicals to which physicians in Belgium subscribed, sometimes reproducing elaborately illustrated works, such as Cruveilhier's atlas of pathology. It was neither an encyclopedia nor a periodical in the conventional sense. The list of volumes and links to digital facsimiles are available from Universiteits Bibliotheek Gent at this link.



Subjects: Encyclopedias
  • 326

Descriptive and illustrated catalogue of the physiological series of comparative anatomy contained in the Museum [of the Royal College of Surgeons of England]. 5 vols.

London: R. & J. E. Taylor, 18331840.

 I. Organs of motion and digestion. 1833.--II. Absorbent, circulating, respiratory, and urinary systems. 1834.--III. pt. I. Nervous system and organs of sense. pt. II. Connective and tegumentary systems and peculiarities. 1836.--IV. Organs of generation. 1838.--V. Products of generation. 1840. 

When John Hunter died his museum was cared for by his faithful assistant and amanuensis, the artist and anatomist, William Clift, who persuaded the Government to purchase it. Richard Owen later became curator and his monumental catalogue is still of value today. A history of the museum from its foundation to its partial destruction by a high-explosive bomb in May 1941, is given in G. Grey Turner’s Hunterian Museum, 1946.



Subjects: COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 989

Experiments and observations on the gastric juice, and the physiology of digestion.

Plattsburgh, NY: F. P Allen, 1833.

Alexis St. Martin, a Canadian half-breed who had sustained a gastric fistula, was treated and investigated by Beaumont. With his human medium, Beaumont as the first to study digestion and the movements of the stomach in vivo. His work on the subject was the most important before Pavlov. Edinburgh imprint, 1838. Second edition, corrected, Burlington, Vt., 1847. Facsimile reprint, Cambridge, Harvard Univ. Press, 1929.



Subjects: GASTROENTEROLOGY › Anatomy & Physiology of Digestion
  • 411

Anatomical studies of the bones and muscles, for the use of artists. From drawings by the late John Flaxman, Esq. R.A. Engraved by Henry Landseer. With two additional plates, and explanatory notes, by William Robertson.

London: M. A. Nattali, 1833.

Digital facsimile from digitalcollections.nypl.org at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration, ANATOMY › Anatomy for Artists, ART & Medicine & Biology
  • 411.1

The hand: Its mechanism and vital endowments as evincing design.

London: William Pickering, 1833.

Classic work on the anatomy, physiology, bio-mechanics, comparative anatomy, and adaptive importance of the hand. Issued as a volume in a series entitled the "Bridgewater Treatises." The first edition has 288pp. An enlarged second edition with 314pp. was also published in 1833, without notice on the title page



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, Biomechanics, COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences › Natural Theology
  • 1359

On the reflex function of the medulla oblongata and medulla spinalis.

Phil. Trans., 123, 635-65, 1833.

“Hall showed that reflex activity could be distinguished from other types of movement, that it produced what today we call ‘muscle tone,’ that it included sneezing coughing, and vomiting, and that it could be influenced by disease. The discovery of these characteristics, and the general formulation of the reflex concept, remain Hall’s outstanding contributions… [Hall and Johannes Müller] were able to rely entirely upon their experimental findings, and, unlike their predecessors, could discount the intervention of the soul and so exclude the metaphysical miasma that had clouded much of the previous work on the subject of reflex activity” (Clarke and O’Malley, 1996, p. 347). 



Subjects: NEUROSCIENCE › NERVOUS SYSTEM › Spinal Cord
  • 1854

Ueber die Darstellung des Atropins in weissen Krystallen.

Ann. Chem. Pharm. 6, 67-72, 1833.

Mein isolated atropine in pure form in 1831. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Nightshade, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Nightshade › Atropine
  • 203.8

Recherches sur les ossemens fossiles découvertes dans les cavernes de la province de Liège. 2 vols. and atlas.

Liège, Belgium: Collardin, 18331834.

A physician from Delft, Schmerling found extensive human remains and artifacts associated with the remains of extinct animals in the caverns around Liège. He concluded that these findings were evidence for human antiquity. Although Schmerling’s findings were widely acknowledged, the scientific establishment was not yet ready to accept the idea of the antiquity of man.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Physical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Belgium, EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution
  • 3586

A memoir on the advantages and practicability of dividing the stricture in strangulated hernia on the outside of the sac.

London: Longman, 1833.

Introduction of the principle of dividing a stricture outside the sac in cases of strangulated hernia.



Subjects: SURGERY: General › Hernia
  • 3616

Abscess of the liver, with hydatids. – Operation.

Lancet, 1, 189-90, 1833.

Diagnostic liver puncture.



Subjects: HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver
  • 3366

Erfahrungen über die Erkenntniss und Heilung der langwierigen Schwerhörigkeit.

Berlin: Nicolai, 1833.

Kramer’s first and best work. English translation, 1837.



Subjects: OTOLOGY
  • 2953

Case of aneurism of the right subclavian artery, in which that vessel was tied within the scaleni muscles.

Amer. J. med. Sci., 12, 354-59, 1833.

In his day Mott was the ablest exponent of vascular surgery in the U.S.A. This was the first attempt in America to ligate the subclavian within the scaleni muscles. The procedure had been tried at least twice previously in Europe.



Subjects: VASCULAR SURGERY › Ligations
  • 4290

Lithotripsie. Mémoires sur la lithotripsie par percussion.

Paris: Bêchet, 1833.

Heurteloup designed the best lithotrite of the time. He was one of several claimants to the distinction of having introduced modern lithotrity. See Lancet, 1831-32, 2, 567-70.



Subjects: UROLOGY › Urinary Calculi
  • 4320

Die Durchschneidung der Achillessehne, als Heilmethode des Klumpfusses, durch zwei Fälle erläutert.

Mag. ges. Heilk., 39, 195-218, 1833.

Successful tenotomy for clubfoot established the reputation of Stromeyer as an orthopedic surgeon.



Subjects: GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Hereditary Disorders of the Skeleton › Clubfoot, ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Foot / Ankle, Podiatry
  • 5054

Mémoire sur un cas de trachéotomie pratiquée dans la période extréme de croup.

J. Connaiss. méd.-chir., 1, 5, 41, 1833.

Trousseau popularized tracheotomy.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5336.5

Notes of a peculiar appearance observed in human muscle, probably depending upon the formation of very small cysticerci.

Lond. med. Gaz., 11, 605, 1833.

Hilton described Trichinella spiralis and suggested its parasitic nature.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis
  • 5849

A treatise on the diseases of the eye.

London: John Churchill, 1833.

Based on lectures delivered by Lawrence at the London Ophthalmic Infirmary. He was a surgeon to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital; he succeeded Abernethy as lecturer on surgery and did much to advance the surgery of the eye.



Subjects: OPHTHALMOLOGY › Diseases of the Eye, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ocular Surgery & Procedures
  • 6028

Traité pratique des maladies de l’utérus et de ses annexes. 2 vols. and atlas.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1833.

Boivin and Dugès practiced amputation of the cervix for chronic ulceration. On page 648 of vol. 2 is the first recorded case of cancer of the female urethra. English translation, 1834.



Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY, ONCOLOGY & CANCER, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 5215

A treatise on the venereal disease and its varieties.

London: Burgess & Hill, 1833.

On p. 371 commences the first description of lymphogranuloma venereum, which Wallace called “indolent primary syphilitic bubo”.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Lymphogranuloma Venereum
  • 6754.1

Medical bibliography, A and B.

York, England: Printed at the Gazette-Office, 1833.

Although of limited scientific value, this extensively annotated work is the most humorous bibliography of medical literature ever published, even if the humor is of a "rarified" nature. Atkinson, surgeon to the Duke of York and senior surgeon to York County Hospital, published this work when he was 74 years old. There is nothing in it to indicate that he ever intended to continue the work beyond the letter B. Most copies were issued with a cancel title, London, John Churchill, 1834.  Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographical Classics
  • 6604.93

Essai sur l’iconologie médicale, ou sur les rapports d’utilité qui existent entre l’art du dessin et l’étude de la médecine.

Montpellier: Veuve Picot, 1833.

Pioneering study of art and medicine based on collections at Montpellier.



Subjects: ART & Medicine & Biology
  • 6855

Systematisches Alphabetisches Repertorium der antipsorischen Arzneien mit Einschluss der antisyphilitic und antipsorischen Arzneien.

Munster: Coppenrath, 1833.

Foreward by Hahnemann. Translated into English from the second German edition by C. M. Roger, as A Systematic, Alphabetic Repertory of Homoeopathic Remedies. Part First. Embracing the Antisporic, Antisyphilitic, and Antisycotic Remedies, Philadelphia: Boericke & Tafel, 1900.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy
  • 7260

Ueber den Zustand der Heilkunde und über die Volkskrankheiten in der europäischen und asiatischen Türkei. Ein Beitrag zur Kultur- und Sittengeschichte.

Hamburg: Perthes & Besser, 1833.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Turkey
  • 8208

The Taleef shereef, or Indian materia medica translated from the original by George Playfair, Superintending Surgeon, Bengal Service. Published by The Medical and Physical Society of Calcutta.

Calcutta: Printed at the Baptist Mission Press, 1833.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › India, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 9668

Ueber das Gift der Fische: mit vergleichender Berücksichtigung des Giftes von Muscheln, Käse, Gehirn, Fleisch, Fett und Würsten, so wie der sogenannten mechanischen Gifte.

Tübingen: C. F. Osiander, 1833.

Discusses all then known posionsous and venomous fishes, including freshwater and marine species, and includes a "thorough review of practically all the early literature on poisonous and venomous fishes, a list of all the species incriminated, symptomatology, treatment, and origin of the poisons in nature" (Halstead, Poisonous and venomous marine animals of the world, 68). Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: TOXICOLOGY › Zootoxicology, ZOOLOGY › Ichthyology
  • 10177

The naturalist's library. Edited by Sir William Jardine. 40 vols.

Edinburgh: W. H. Lizars & London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 18331866.
  1. "1833, Natural History of Humming Birds, Part I, (Ornithology Vol. VI) by William Jardine, with memoir of Carl Linnaeus. (online)
  2. 1833, Monkeys, (Mammalia Vol. I) by William Jardine, with a memoir of Comte de Buffon (online)
  3. Humming Birds Part II, (Ornithology Vol. VII) by William Jardine, with a memoir of Thomas Pennant. (online)
  4. 1834, The Natural History of the Felinae, (lions, tigers etc.) (Mammalia Vol. II) by William Jardine, with a memoir of Georges Cuvier. (online)
  5. 1834, The Natural History of Gallinaceous birds, (peacockspheasantsturkeys, etc.) (Ornithology Vol. III), by William Jardine, with a memoir of Aristotle. (online)
  6. 1835, The Natural History of Fishes of the Perch family, (Ichthyology Vol. I), by William Jardine, with a memoir of Sir Joseph Banks. (online)
  7. 1835, British Butterflies, (Entomology Vol. III) by James Duncan, with a memoir of Abraham Gottlob Werner.(online)
  8. 1836, The Natural History of Parrots, (Ornithology Vol. VI), by Prideaux John Selby, with plates by Edward Lear and a memoir of Thomas Bewick.
  9. 1836, MammaliaPachydermes, Vol. V., by William Jardine, with a Memoir of Sir Hans Sloane. (online)
  10. 1836: Entomology: British MothsSphinxes, &c., Vol. IV., by James Duncan, with a Memoir of Madam Maria Sibylla Merian (online)
  11. 1837, Mammalia: On the Ordinary Cetacea or Whales, Vol. VI, by William Jardine, with a Memoir of Bernard Germain de Lacépède. (online)
  12. 1837. The Natural History of Foreign Butterflies, Entomology, Vol. V., by James Duncan, with a Memoir of Jean-Baptiste Lamarck. (online)
  13. 1837. The Natural History of the Birds of Western Africa, Vol. II., Ornithology, Vol. VIII, by William John Swainson, with a Memoir of François Levaillant. (online)
  14. 1838. The Natural History of the Birds of Great Britain and Ireland, Part I. Birds of PreyOrnithology, Vol. IX., by William Jardine, with a memoir of Sir Robert Sibbald. (online)
  15. 1844, The Natural History of Game Birds, Vol. XXI, (Ornithology Vol. XIII), by William Jardine, with a memoir of Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles (online)
  16. 1852, Natural History of Beetles, Vol. XXXV, (Entomology), by James Duncan, with a memoir of John Ray. (online)
  17. Pigeons, (Ornithology Vol. IX), by Prideaux John Selby, with a memoir of Pliny the Elder. (online)
  18. 1866, MammaliaDeerAntelopesCamels, &c., Vol. XXI, by William Jardine, with a Memoir of Petrus Camper. (online)
  19. 1866, MammaliaGoats, Sheep, Oxen, &C, Vol. XXII, by William Jardine, with a Memoir of John Hunter. (online)
  20. 1866, OrnithologyParrots, Vol. X, by Prideaux John Selby, with a Memoir of Thomas Bewick. (online)
  21. 1862. Ornithology: Birds of Western Africa, Part I, Vol. XI., by William John Swainson, with a Memoir of James Bruce. (online)
  22. 1838, Flycatchers or Muscicapidae, The Natural Arrangement and Relations, Thirty-three Coloured Plates, Vol.X, by William John Swainson, with Portrait and Memoir of Albrecht von Haller. (online)
  23. 1838, British Quadrupeds, A History of, by William MacGillivray, with a Portrait and Memoir of Ulysses Aldrovandi. (online)
  24. 1839, Amphibious Carnivora; including the Walrus and Seals, and the Herbivorous CetaceaMermaids, &c., Vol.VII by Robert Hamilton, with Portrait and Memoir of François Péron. (online)
  25. 1866, Birds of Great Britain and Ireland, Part II., Vol.II Ornithology, edited by William Jardine, with Portrait and Memoir of William Smellie. (online)
  26. 1839, Dogs, Canidae or Genus Canis of Authors, including The Genera Hyaena and Proteles, Vol. I., Mammalia Vol.IX, by Lieut-Col. Chas Hamilton Smith, with Portrait and Memoir of Peter Simon Pallas. (online)
  27. 1859, EntomologyBees. Vol.XXXIV Edited by William Jardine, with a Portrait and Memoir of François Huber. (online)
  28. 1843, Ichthyology. Fishes, particularly their Structure and Economical Uses, &c, by John Stevenson Bushnan, with Portrait and Memoir of Hippolito Salviani. (online)
  29. 1840, Dogs, Canidae or Genus Canis of Authors, including The Genera Hyaena and Proteles, Vol. II., Mammalia Vol.X, by Lieut-Col. Chas Hamilton Smith, with Portrait and Memoir of Don Felix D'azara. (online)
  30. 1840, Introduction to Entomology, Vol.I, by James Duncan, with Memoirs of John Swammerdam and Charles De Geer, and Portrait of the latter. (online)
  31. 1841, Marsupialia or Pouched Animals, Mammalia Vol. XI, by G. R. Waterhouse, with a Memoir and Portrait of Dr. John BarClay. (online)
  32. 1841, Horses. The Equidae or Genus Equus of Authors. Mammalia XII, by Lieut-Col. Chas Hamilton SmithThirty-five Coloured Plates, with Portrait and Memoir of Conrad Gessner. (online)
  33. 1841. IchthyologyFishes of Guiana, Part I., Vol.III, by Robert H. Schomburgk with an autobiographical Portrait and Account, together with his Voyages and Travels. (online)
  34. 1841, Entomology. Exotic Moths, Vol. VII, by James Duncan, with Portrait and Memoir of Pierre André Latreille. (online)
  35. 1842, Birds of Great Britain and Ireland, Part III. Rasores and Grallatores, Vol.III Ornithology, edited by William Jardine, with Portrait and Memoir of John Walker, D.D. (online)
  36. 1842, An Introduction to Mammalia, Vol.XIII, by Lieut Col Charles Hamilton Smith with Portrait and Memoir of Dru Drury. (online)
  37. 1864, Nectarinidae, or Sun-Birds, by William Jardine, with a Portrait and Memoir of Francis Willughby. (online)
  38. 1860, IchthyologyBritish Fishes, Vol. XXXVI. Part. I, by Robert Hamilton, with a Portrait and Memoir of William Rondelet. (online)
  39. 1833, IchthyologyBritish Fishes, Vol. XXXVII. Part. II, by Robert Hamilton, with Portrait and Memoir of Alexander von Humboldt. (online)
  40. 1843. IchthyologyFishes of Guiana, Part II., by Robert H. Schomburgk with, Portrait and Memoir of John Lewis Burckhardt. (online)
  41. 1860, Birds of Great Britain and Ireland, Part IV, by William Jardine, with a Portrait and Memoir of Alexander Wilson, D.D. (online)" 

"Jardine made natural history available to all levels of Victorian society by editing the hugely popular forty volumes of The Naturalist's Library (1833–1843) issued and published by his brother in law, the Edinburgh printer and engraver, William Home Lizars.[11] The series was divided into four main sections: Ornithology (14 volumes), Mammalia (13 volumes), Entomology (7 volumes), and Ichthyology (6 volumes); each prepared by a leading naturalist. James Duncan wrote the insect volumes. The artists responsible for the illustrations included Edward Lear. The work was published in Edinburgh by W. H. Lizars." (Wikipedia article on William Jardine, accessed 03-2018).



Subjects: NATURAL HISTORY, ZOOLOGY, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology, ZOOLOGY › Ichthyology, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Primatology, ZOOLOGY › Ornithology
  • 10389

The manufacturing population of England, its moral, social, and physical conditions, and the changes which have arisen from the use of steam machinery; with an examination of infant labour.

London: Baldwin and Cradock, 1833.

Gaskell, a physician, addressed social, political and public health problems that resulted from the Industrial Revolution. Gaskell issued a revised edition of this work in 1836 under a different title: Artisans and Machinery The Moral and Physical Condition of the Manufacturing Population Considered with Reference to Mechanical Substitutes of Human Labour. Digital facsimile of the 1833 work from the Internet Archive at this link; of the 1836 work at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE , SOCIAL MEDICINE
  • 10824

The dispensatory of the United States of America.

Philadelphia: Grigg and Elliot, 1833.

Digital facsimile of this, the first, and later editions from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Medical Botany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS
  • 11308

A catalogue descriptive chiefly of the morbid preparations contained in the museum of Manchester Theatre of Anatomy and Medicine, Marsden Street. With occasional explanatory remarks.

Manchester: Printed by Harrison and Crosfield, 1833.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 12866

Dentologia, a poem on the diseases of the teeth and their proper remedies. With notes, practical, historical, illustrative, and explanatory, by Eleazar Parmly.

New York: Peabody & Co., 1833.

Brown founded the first US dental school, the first US national dental society, called The American Association of Dental Surgeons, and the first US dental journal, entitled the American Journal and Library of Dental Science.  This work was an unusual type of partnership between Brown and Parmly, with Brown composing the poem, and Parmly, who was also a dentist-poet, composing all the extensive notes which occupied about half the volume. Digital facsimile from U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: DENTISTRY, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Poetry
  • 13149

Hunterian reminiscences; being the substance of a course of lectures on the principles and practice of surgery, delivered by the late John Hunter, in the year 1785: Taken in short-hand, and afterwards fairly transcribed by the late James Parkinson ... Edited by his son, J.W.K. Parkinson ..., by whom are appended illustrative notes.

London: Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1833.

Digital facsimile from wellcomecollection.org at this link.



Subjects: SURGERY: General
  • 1993
  • 4478.104

Gymnastikens allmänna grunder.

Uppsala, Sweden: Palmblad & Co & Leffler & Sebell, 1834, 1840.

The foundation of modern gymnastics and therapeutic massage. Ling established the Swedish school of physiotherapy with his institute for training gymnastics teachers in Stockholm in 1813. He developed the ancient Greek art of calisthenics into a science based on sound anatomical and physiological principles. “After Ling, scientific body building by rational calisthenics became a recognized procedure not only for the weak child or adult, but, of even greater consequence, as an integral part of the plans for preventative medicine which were taking form in the schools and gymnasia of all civilized nations” (Bick).



Subjects: PHYSICAL MEDICINE / REHABILITATION › Exercise / Training / Fitness, PHYSICAL MEDICINE / REHABILITATION › Physical Therapy, PREVENTATIVE MEDICINE, Sports Medicine
  • 601

Handbuch der Physiologie des Menschen.

Coblenz: J. Hölscher, 18341840.

The first modern, systematic textbook on physiology, presenting an authoritative and discerning survey of each aspect of the science. This is also one of the best reviews of physiological literature during the first part of the 19th century. Through an extensive series of publications and the Arch. Anat. Physiol, wiss. Med. which he edited, Müller made fundamental contributions to anatomy and physiology, pathological anatomy and histology, embryology, and zoology. Vol. 1 was issued in parts, 1833-34, and Vol. 2 was issued in parts, 1837-40. A somewhat abbreviated English translation was published, 1838-42.



Subjects: PHYSIOLOGY
  • 4636

Cerebral affections of children.

Amer. J. med. Sci., 13, 313-59; 14, 99-111, 1834.

Accurate clinical description of tuberculous meningitis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases › Meningitis, NEUROLOGY › Inflammatory Conditions › Cerebrospinal Meningitis, PEDIATRICS
  • 2163

Traité théorique et pratique des blessures par armes de guerre. 2 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1834.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE
  • 481

De necessitate aëris atmosphaerici ad evolutionem pulli in ovo incubito. Dissertatio inauguralis physiologica....

Berlin: Typis Nietackianis, 1834.

Proof that air is necessary in the development of the embryo. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: EMBRYOLOGY
  • 1855

Ueber einige Producte der Steinkohlendestillation.

Ann. Phys. Chem. (Lpz.), 31, 65-77, 513-24; 32, 308-32, 1834.

Carbolic acid first prepared from coal-tar.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Disinfectants
  • 1457
  • 3368

De pulsu, resorptione, auditu et tactu. Annotationes anatomicae et physiologicae.

Leipzig: C. F. Koehler, 1834.

Includes Weber’s law on the relationship between stimulus and sensation. English translation of De tactu, New York Academic Press, 1978. Weber's hearing test is on p.41.



Subjects: OTOLOGY › Physiology of Hearing, PSYCHOLOGY › Psychophysics, PSYCHOLOGY › Sensation / Perception
  • 1497

The anatomy of the human eye.

London: Longmans, 1834.

First English work on ocular anatomy.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Anatomy of the Eye & Orbit
  • 2289

Principles and illustrations of morbid anatomy.

London: Whittaker & Co., 1834.

Hope left a fine pathological atlas with brilliantly hand-coloured lithographs from his own drawings. While the book does not equal the atlases of Cruveilhier and Carswell, it is important as being a great stimulus to the study of pathology in England.



Subjects: PATHOLOGY, PATHOLOGY › Pathology Illustration
  • 2748.2

Le sphygmomètre; instrument qui traduit à l’oeil toute l’action des artères.

Paris: Crochard, 1834.

Hérisson invented an instrument for recording blood pressure.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › Medical Instruments
  • 3222

Illustrations of pulmonary consumption.

Philadelphia: Key & Biddle, 1834.

Morton published an important collection of illustrations delineating pulmonary tuberculosis which epitomized the knowledge of his time. It was also the first book on the subject published in the United States. Digital facsimile from the National Library of Medicine, Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: PATHOLOGY › Pathology Illustration, PULMONOLOGY › Lung Diseases › Pulmonary Tuberculosis
  • 4319

Aufsätze und Abhandlungen aus dem Gebiete der Medizin, Chirurgie und Staatsarzneikunde. 1, 196

Berlin: T.C.F. Enslin, 1834.

First description of “Rust’s disease” – tuberculous spondylitis of the cervical vertebrae.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tuberculosis › Tuberculous Spondylitis (Pott's Disease), ORTHOPEDICS › Diseases of or Injuries to Bones, Joints & Skeleton
  • 4167

On the anatomy and diseases of the neck of the bladder, and of the urethra.

London: Burgess & Hill, 1834.

Guthrie was the first to describe non-prostatic obstruction at the neck of the bladder. On p. 252 of the above work is an account of Guthrie’s prostatic catheter for use in trans-urethral prostatectomy.



Subjects: INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › Surgical Instruments, UROLOGY
  • 5591

Manuel de médecine opératoire.

Paris: Germer Baillière, 1834.

Malgaigne was a brilliant lecturer, notable also as a historian of medieval surgery. His Manuel was an important work on operative surgery, and was translated into English, German, Italian, and Arabic.



Subjects: SURGERY: General
  • 6028.1

Calculus in the bladder. Incontinence of urine. Vesico-vaginal fistula. Advantages of the gilt-wire suture.

Lancet, 5, 1, 345-6, London, 1834.

Gosset repaired a vesicovaginal fistula of eleven years’ duration, using silver gilt-wire, removed after 9, 12 and 21 days respectively.



Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY › Vesicovaginal Fistula
  • 6029

Mémoire sur la restauration du périnée chez la femme dans les cas de division ou de rupture complète de cette partie.

Gaz. méd. Paris, 2 sér., 2, 17-22, 1834.

Roux was the first to suture the ruptured female perineum.



Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY
  • 7480

Rapport sur la marche et les effets du choléra-morbus dans Paris et les communes rurales du département de la Seine par la commission nommée, avec l'approbation de M. le ministre du commerce et des travaux publics, par MM. les préfets de la Seine et de police; année 1832.

Paris: Imprimerie Royale, 1834.

This work contained one of the earliest applications of spatial analysis in epidemiology—an early thematic map by geographer and cartographer Charles Picquet, in which the 48 districts of Paris were represented by gray-scale gradient according to the percentage of deaths from cholera per 1000 inhabitants. Digital facsimile from BnF Gallica at this link.



Subjects: Cartography, Medical & Biological, DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics › Graphic Display of, EPIDEMIOLOGY, GRAPHIC DISPLAY of Medical & Scientific Information, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 8420

Apollonii, Citiensis, Stephani, Palladii, Theophili, Meletii, Damascii, Ioannis, aliorum: Scholia in Hippocratem et Galenum e codicibus Mss. Vindobonens. Monacens. Florentin. Mediolanens. Escorialens, etc. Primum Graece edidit Fridericus Reinholdus Dietz.

Königsberg: Gebrüder Bornträger, 1834.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, BYZANTINE MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE
  • 8662

Hortus medicus, or figures and descriptions of the more important plants used in medicine, or possessed of poisonous qualities; with their medical properties, chemical analysis, &c. &c. By George Graves. The chemical and medical departments by John Davie Morries.

Edinburgh: Adam and Charles Black & London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green, 1834.

This materia medica, with fine hand-colored plates, also includes and illustrates poisonous plants with detailed discussion of their properties.  It includes recommended dosages for pharmaceutical preparations. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Medical Botany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, TOXICOLOGY
  • 10024

The anatomy and surgery of inguinal and femoral hernia.

London: John Churchill, 1834.

Published in the same large folio format as Tuson's Myology (1828), this was the largest work on hernia ever published with multiple hand-colored. lift-up flats on three plates.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration, SURGERY: General › Hernia
  • 10259

The natural history of the order Cetacea, and the oceanic inhabitants of the Arctic regions.

London: Published by the Author, 1834.

Characterizing himself "Surgeon-Accoucheur" on the title page, Dewhurst lectured in 1827-8 on anatomy and physiology, and served as a ship's surgeon, making voyage to Greenland and its surrounding seas in 1824. During that voyage he  studied large Arctic creatures, especially whales. In the decade after his return Dewhurst prepared this description of polar sea life.  Whales were of especial interest in this period, because of the use of their blubber in many household objects, and the value of their oil for lamps, as whale oil burned without soot. Dewhurst's work was one of the first studies to examine the different species of whales, as well as dolphins and other marine life. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Arctic, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Marine Mammals, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Marine Mammals › Cetacea
  • 10380

Descriptive catalogue of the preparations in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Vol. I. (Anatomy). Vol. 2. (Pathology).

Dublin: Hodges & Smith & Edinburgh: Maclachlan & Stewart, 18341840.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Ireland, MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , PATHOLOGY
  • 10394

Jurisprudence de la médecine, de la chirurgie, et de la pharmacie en France, comprenant la médecine légale, la police médicale, la responsabilitié des médecins, chirurgiens, pharmaciens, etc, l'exposé et la discussion des lois, ordonnances, réglemens et instructions concernant l'art de guérir, appuyé des jugemens des cours et des tribunaux.

Paris, 1834.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, Ethics, Biomedical, LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS, PUBLIC HEALTH, SOCIAL MEDICINE
  • 11151

Biographie des sages-femmes célèbres, anciennes, modernes et contemporaines. Avec 20 portraits.

Paris: chez Trinquart et chez l'auteur, 1834.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Midwives
  • 12017

Histoire naturelle des crustacés, comprenant l'anatomie, la physiologie et la classification de ces animaux. 3 vols. + Atlas.

Paris: Librairie Encyclopédique de Roret, 18341840.

Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: ZOOLOGY › Malacology
  • 12275

A history of Egyptian mummies, and an account of the worship and embalming of the sacred animals of the Egyptians; with remarks on the funeral ceremonies of different nations, and observations on the mummies of the Canary islands, of the ancient Peruvians, Burman priests, &c. By Thomas J. Pettigrew. Illustrated by George Cruikshank.

London: Longman, 1834.

"One of the most valuable works on the subject extant. It is a monument of exact observation, and considering the state of archaeological knowledge at the time, it is in every way admirable" (Dawson, Bibliography of works relating to mummification in Egypt [1929], 97). Surgeon and medical writer as well as antiquary (he vaccinated Queen Victoria), Pettigrew was one of the founding members of the British Archaeological Society, whose early meetings were held in his house. Illustrated with hand-colored plates mostly from drawings by the famous artist / caricaturist George Cruikshank, best known as the illustrator of Dickens' novels.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Embalming, ANTHROPOLOGY › Cultural Anthropology
  • 12395

An inquiry into the claims of Doctor William Harvey to the discovery of the circulation of the blood; with a more equitable retrospect of that event. To which is added an introductory lecture delivered on the third of November, 18929, in vindication of Hippocrates from sundry charges of ignorance preferred against him by the late professor Rush.

Philadelphia: E. L. Carey & A. Hart, 1834.

Perhaps the earliest American monograph on the history of circulation. Keynes characterized this volume as "an elaborate and very learned attempt to belittle Harvey's achievement" Keynes, Life of William Harvey, p. 425.) Digital facsimile from Google Books (at this link.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › History of Cardiology, PHYSIOLOGY › History of Physiology
  • 12900

The conchologist.

Boston: Russell, Odiorne & Metcalf, 1834.

The first American manual of conchology. The author, John Warren, was an Englishman who sold shells and other collectibles in Boston as well as to other collectors in the United States. His book organized shells according to both the Linnean and Lamarckian systems of classification. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ZOOLOGY › Malacology
  • 13091

Pharmacopoeia Homoeopathica.

London: S. Highley, 1834.

The first systematic work on homeopathy published in England. A rather late work to be published in Latin.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy
  • 602

De phaenomeno generali et fundamentali motus vibratorii contini in membranis.

Wroclaw (Vratislava, Breslau): sumpt. A. Schulz et soc., , 1835.

Classical paper on ciliary epithelial motion. Reprinted in Purkynĕ’s Opera omnia (No. 82), pp. 277-371, 1918. English translation in Dublin J. med. chem. Sci., 1835, 7, 279-84.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Cell Biology
  • 603

The cyclopaedia of anatomy and physiology. Edited by Robert Bentley Todd. 5 vols.

London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 18351859.

Contributors included Richard Owen and Thomas Huxley, and physicians James Paget, James Young Simpson, and William Bowman.The discoveries of Purkynĕ and Valentin, together with additional observations by William Sharpey himself were embodied in an article on Cilia written by him and published in odd’s Cyclopaedia 1, 606-38. Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, ANATOMY › Comparative Anatomy, BIOLOGY › Cell Biology, Encyclopedias, PHYSIOLOGY
  • 4663

Paralysis in childhood. Four remarkable cases of suddenly induced paralysis in the extremities, occurring in children, without any apparent cerebral or cerebro-spinal lesion.

Lond. med. Gaz. 17, 215-18, London, 1835.

Important clinical description.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Child Neurology, NEUROLOGY › Inflammatory Conditions › Poliomyelitis
  • 439

Antiquitates anatomicae rariores, quibus origo, incrementa et status anatomes, apud antiquissimae memoriae gentes, historica fide illustrantur.

Vienna: Congregationis Mechitaristicae, 1835.

Anatomical terms used in antiquity, representing to a certain, extent a survey of the literature of ancient medicine available to Hyrtl. Digital facsimile from The Medical Heritage Library, Internet Archive, at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › History of Anatomy, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Egypt, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 78

The works of John Hunter. With notes. Edited by J.F. Palmer. 4 vols. and atlas.

London: Longman, 18351837.

Hunter gave a great impetus to the study of morbid anatomy; he was the veritable founder of experimental and surgical pathology and one of the three greatest surgeons of all time. He was responsible for the commencement of some of the greatest medical museums; the Hunterian museum of the Royal College of Surgeons of England was based on his own private collection; much of it was destroyed during an air raid in World War II. Vol. I of the above work includes Drewry Ottley’s Life of Hunter. A list of the books written by Hunter, and their location in British libraries, was published by W. R. LeFanu in 1946. The biography by Jessie Dobson, Edinburgh, 1969, includes a chronological list of Hunter’s writings. For a detailed analysis of his scientific works within the context of his life see John Hunter…by George Qvist, London, [1981].



Subjects: COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, Collected Works: Opera Omnia, PATHOLOGY, SURGERY: General
  • 109.1

Einige Bemerkungen und Fragen über das Keimbläschen (vesicula germinativa).

Arch. Anat. Physiol. wiss. Med., 373-7., 1835.

Wagner saw and described the nucleolus.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Cell Biology, MICROBIOLOGY
  • 2212

A discourse on self-limited diseases.

Boston, MA: N. Hale, 1835.

Bigelow was attached to the Massachusetts General Hospital. The above “did more than any other work or essay in our own language to rescue the practice of medicine from the slavery of the drugging system which was part of the inheritance of the profession” (Oliver Wendell Holmes).



Subjects: Medicine: General Works
  • 1698

Recherches sur les effets de la saignée dans quelques maladies inflammatoires, et sur l’action de l’émétique et des vésicatoires dans la pneumonie.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1835.

Louis refuted Broussais’s system of medicine, his “médicine physiologique.”  Louis was instrumental in establishing medicine as an exact science by the introduction of the numerical or statistical method. English translation by C. G. Putnam, with preface and appendix by James Jackson as Researches on the effects of bloodletting in some inflammatory diseases, Boston, 1836.



Subjects: DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tuberculosis, THERAPEUTICS › Bloodletting
  • 1698.1

Sur l’homme et le développement des facultés, ou essai de physique sociale. 2 vols.

Paris: Bachelier, 1835.

Quetelet’s statistical researches on the development of the physical and intellectual qualities of man, and an exposition of his concept of the “average man”, which became the by-word of quantitative studies. "Quételet suggested that the ratio of the subject’s weight divided by the square of the height could be used as a measure of fatness that corrected for differences in height. This unit, the Body Mass Index (BMI), is still known as the ‘Quételet Index’ (QI) in some European countries; BMI has been shown to correlate with body fat content, and to predict risk for several of the comorbidities of obesity" (Bray, History of Obesity, IN: Obesity: Science to Practice Edited by Gareth Williams and Gema Frühbeck [2009]). English translation as A treatise on man and the development of his faculties (Edinburgh: William and Robert Chambers, 1842). Digital facsimile of the 1835 edition from the Internet Archive at this link, of the English translation at this linkSee No. 171.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Physical Anthropology, DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, Obesity Research, Statistics, Biomedical
  • 1717
CONSTITUTIO CRIMINALIS CAROLINA

Kaiser Karl’s des Fünften Peinlich Gerichtsordnung … Hrsg. von R. Schmid.

Jena: A. Schmid, 1835.

The Constitutio Criminalis of the Emperor Charles V (circa 1533) is probably the oldest European document of any importance dealing with medical jurisprudence. It authorized judges to call expert witnesses in medico-legal cases.



Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine)
  • 2379

Treatment of the venereal disease by the hydriodate of potash, or iodide of potassium.

Lancet, 2, 5-11., London, 18351836.

Wallace introduced potassium iodide in the treatment of syphilis, reporting good results in 139 patients.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis
  • 2532

Del mal del segno calcinaccio o moscardino malattia che affligge i bachi da seta e sul modo di liberarne le bigattaje anche le piu infestate. 2 vols.

Lodi: Tipografia Orcesi, 18351836.

Bassi preceded Louis Pasteur in the discovery that microorganisms can be the cause of disease (the germ theory of disease). He discovered that the muscardine disease of silkworms--a disease that was destroying the silk industry--was caused by a living, very small, parasitic organism, a fungus that would be named eventually Beauveria bassiana in his honor. To cure and prevent the disease Bassini recommended the use of disinfectants, separating the rows of feeding caterpillars, isolating and destroying infected caterpillars, and keeping the farms clean.

In demonstrating the parasitic nature of the muscardine disease of silkworms, Bassi also founded the doctrine of pathogenic microorganisms. His ideas inspired Henle (1840; No. 2533).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › GENERAL PRINCIPLES of Infection by Microorganisms, MICROBIOLOGY, Mycology, Medical, PARASITOLOGY › Parasitic Fungi
  • 1992

The coldwater cure, its principles, theory, and practice.

London: W. Strange, 1835.

Priessnitz, a peasant farmer in Gräfenberg, Austrian Silesia, is generally considered the founder of modern hydrotherapy, which is used in alternative and orthodox medicine. Priessnitz stressed remedies such as suitable food, air, exercise, rest and water, over conventional medicine, and is also credited with laying the foundations of what became known as the "Nature Cure," though his main focus was on hydrotherapeutic techniques



Subjects: THERAPEUTICS › Hydrotherapy
  • 3738

A practical essay on the history and treatment of beriberi.

Madras: Government Press, 1835.

A classic account, in which the author brought together all that was known about the disease in his day.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, NUTRITION / DIET › Deficiency Diseases › Beriberi
  • 2749

Traité cliniques des maladies du coeur. 2 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1835.

Bouillaud applied Laennec's technique of auscultation to diseases of the heart. Vol. 2, page 238: “Bouillaud’s disease” – rheumatic endocarditis. Although not first to note the cardiac manifestations of acute rheumatism, Bouillaud was the first to demonstrate the frequency and importance of heart disease co-incident with acute articular rheumatism. The above work includes the first description of a case of mitral disease with articular rheumatism. Translation of the section on the pathology of endocarditis in Willius & Keys, Cardiac classics, pp. 446-55. 



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Rheumatic Heart Disease, CARDIOLOGY › Tests for Heart & Circulatory Function › Auscultation and Physical Diagnosis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Endocarditis
  • 3367

Die Erkenntniss und Heilung der Ohrenkrankheiten.

Berlin: Nicolai, 1835.

Kramer was a pioneer German otologist.



Subjects: OTOLOGY › Diseases of the Ear
  • 3815

Palpitation of the heart with enlargement of the thyroid gland.

Lond. med. surg. J. (Renshaw),7, 516-17., 1835.

This is considered the first accurate account of exophthalmic goitre, later known as “Parry’s disease”, “Graves’s disease”, and “Basedow’s disease”. An interesting fact about the London Medical & Surgical Journal is that after the first five volumes had been published by Renshaw and edited by M. Ryan, these two separated, each continuing to publish a separate edition of the same journal. Graves’s paper appeared in the series published by Renshaw. Reprinted in Med. Classics, 1940, 5, 33-36.



Subjects: ENDOCRINOLOGY › Thyroid
  • 4027

Thèse inaugurale sur la découverte de l’insecte qui produit la contagion de la gale, du prurigo et du phlyzacia.

Paris: Imp. de Didot le jeune, 1835.

Demonstration of the human itch-mite, Sarcoptes scabiei. It was due to Renucci that the Sarcoptes was recognized as the one cause of scabies and its parasitic nature finally accepted.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses, PARASITOLOGY › Sarcoptes scabiei (Itch-Mite)
  • 3440

Lectures on diseases of the rectum. III. Preternatural contraction of the sphincter ani.

Lond. med. Gaz., 16, 26-31, London, 1835.

“Brodie’s pile”. Reprinted in Medical Classics, 1938, 2, 929-40.



Subjects: Colon & Rectal Diseases & Surgery
  • 3440.1

A case of introsussception in which an operation was successfully resorted to…in December, 1831.

Transylvania J. Med. Assoc. Sci., 18, 362 (only), 1835.

First operation for intussusception in the United States, performed in Rutherford County, Tennessee. The patient was a negro slave; the operation was a complete success. Reported by Wilson’s pupil, W.W. Thompson.



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY, GASTROENTEROLOGY › Esophagus: Stomach: Duodenum: Intestines, SURGERY: General › Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Slavery and Medicine, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE › Tennessee
  • 4928

A treatise on insanity and other disorders affecting the mind.

London: Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1835.

Prichard, better known for his work in the field of anthropology (No. 159), was the first to describe moral insanity. He described a syndrome he called incoherence or senile dementia. Alzheimer (No. 4956) may have described essentially the same disorder. Reprint of Philadelphia, 1837 edition, New York, Arno Press, 1973.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Degenerative Disorders › Presenile or Senile Dementia, PSYCHIATRY
  • 5337

Description of a microscopic entozoon infesting the muscles of the human body.

Lond. med. Gaz., 16, 125-127; Trans. zool. Soc. Lond., 1, 315-24, 1835.

While a first-year student at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, James Paget discovered trichina in muscle during dissection. Richard Owen, his teacher, named it Trichina spiralis and published an account, barely mentioning Paget. It was renamed Trichinella spiralis in 1896. Paget communicated his discovery to the Abernethian Society at St. Bartholomew’s on 6 Feb, 1835; an abstract of his paper is published in the Transactions of the society, vol. 2. Paget recorded the chronology of the discovery in a letter to the Lancet, 1866, 1, 269. This and his unpublished article intended for Lond. med. Gaz., 1835, is reproduced by Kean (No. 2268.1), p. 458-62. The letter is also published in Bull. Hist. Med., 1979, 53, 547.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis, PARASITOLOGY › Trichinella
  • 5850

De l’emploi de l’excision et de la cautérisation à l’aide du nitrate d’argent fondu dans l’ophtalmie blenorrhagique.

Paris, 1835.

Silver nitrate for treatment of gonococcal ophthalmia.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Gonorrhoea & Trichomonas Infection, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Diseases of the Eye
  • 6755

A manual of select medical bibliography, in which the books are arranged chronologically according to the subjects, and the derivations of the terms and the nosological and vernacular synonyms of the diseases are given. With an appendix, containing lists of the collected works of authors, systematic treatises on medicine, transactions of societies, journals, &c. &c &c.

London: Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1835.

“First serious attempt by anyone in the English-speaking world to give a subject classification for medical literature” (Fulton). This was first published in volume 4 of Cyclopaedia of practical medicine, edited by Forbes, A. Tweedie, and J. Conolly, 4 vols., London, Sherwood, 1833-34.

Digital facsimile of the 1835 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographical Classics, Nosology
  • 6864

The homoeopathist, or domestic physician. 2 vols.

Philadelphia: J. G. Wesselhoeft, 18351838.

The first book on domestic homeopathy published in the United States. The names of the medicines are not given, but are referred to by numbers. Digital facsimile from the National Library of Medicine at this link



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy
  • 8920

For private distribution. The following pages contain extracts from letters addressed to Professor Henslow by C. Darwin, Esq.

Cambridge, England: [Privately Printed], 1835.

Darwin's teacher, John Stevens Henslow, had some of Darwin's letters to him published for private distribution as a pamphlet while Darwin was on the Beagle circumnavigation. Estimates of the number of copies printed vary from about 25 to about 200.



Subjects: BIOLOGY, EVOLUTION
  • 10108

On the influence of atmosphere and locality; change of air and climate; seasons; food; clothing; bathing; exercise; sleep; corporeal and intellectual pursuits, &c. &c. on human health; constituting elements of hygiéne.

Philadelphia: Carey, Lea & Blanchard, 1835.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Bioclimatology, Hygiene, NUTRITION / DIET, PHYSICAL MEDICINE / REHABILITATION › Exercise / Training / Fitness, THERAPEUTICS › Hydrotherapy
  • 11723

On blood-letting: An account of the curative effects of the abstraction of blood; with rules for employing both local and general blood-letting in the treatment of diseases.

London: J.-B. Baillière, 1835.

Wardrop "promoted blood-letting in an era when a few physicians, notably Pierre Louis of Paris, were discouraging the therapeutic approach" (W. Bruce Fye, "James Wardrop," Profiles in cardiology, 91.) Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: THERAPEUTICS › Bloodletting
  • 11750

Systematisches Handbuch der gerichtlichen Psychologie für Medicinalbeamte, Richter und Vertheidiger.

Leipzig: Otto Wiegand, 1835.

A comprehensive manual on forensic psychiatry, preceding Isaac Ray's book by three years. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › Forensic Psychiatry
  • 12204

Lectures on the means of promoting and preserving health, delivered at the Mechanics' Institute.

London: J. & A. Arch, 1835.

Lectures for "working men" and women on preventative medicine and self-help.  Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: PREVENTATIVE MEDICINE, Self-Help Guides
  • 12688

Memoir of James Jackson, Jr., M. D. with extracts from his letters to his father: and medical cases, collected by him.

Boston: Printed by I. R. Butts, 1835.

Jackson published this biography of his son, James Jackson, Jr. after his son's premature death in 1834. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals
  • 12869

An essay on artifical teeth, obturators, & palates; with the principles for their construction and application: Illustrated by twenty-six cases and twenty-one plates.

London: S. Highley, 1835.

In this work "Koecker was the first English writer to describe corectly the principle upon which artifical teeth should be applied and constructed" (Thorpe, Biographies of pioneer American dentists and their successors" (1910) 55).



Subjects: DENTISTRY › Prosthodontics
  • 326.1

North American herpetology; or, a description of the reptiles inhabiting the United States. 4 vols.

Philadelphia: J. Dobson, 18361840.

The greatest American book on herpetology, and one of the finest American color plate books on natural history. The fourth volume is particularly rare. Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.  In 1842 Holbrook issued an expanded second edition in 5 vols.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), ZOOLOGY › Herpetology, ZOOLOGY › Illustration
  • 604

Mechanik der menschlichen Gehwerkzeuge. 1 vol. and atlas.

Göttingen: in der Dieterichschen Buchhandlung, 1836.

A pioneering study of the physiology and biomechanics of motion and locomotion. The atlas contains illustrations that were printed directly from actual bones embedded in the printing plates. Translated into English by P. Maquet and R. Furlong, as Mechanics of the human walking apparatus, Berlin: Springer, 1992.



Subjects: Biomechanics, PHYSICAL MEDICINE / REHABILITATION › Kinesiology, PHYSIOLOGY › Biophysics
  • 990

Versuche über die künstliche Verdauung des geronnenen Eiweisses.

Arch. Anat. Physiol. wiss. Med., 66-89, 1836.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: GASTROENTEROLOGY › Anatomy & Physiology of Digestion
  • 991

Ueber das Wesen des Verdauungsprocesses.

Arch. Anat. Physiol. wiss. Med., 90-138, 1836.

William Beaumont recognized that the gastric juice contained some other active chemical substance besides hydrochloric acid. Schwann proved this to be pepsin. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: GASTROENTEROLOGY › Anatomy & Physiology of Digestion
  • 1126

Observations on the thyroid gland, with notes on the same subject by Sir Astley Cooper.

Guy’s Hosp. Rep., 1, 429-56, 1836.

King, sometimes referred to as the “father of endocrinology”, antici-pated the endocrine action of the thyroid.



Subjects: Ductless Glands: Internal Secretion › Thyroid, Parathyroids, ENDOCRINOLOGY › Thyroid
  • 4811

Fatal epilepsy, from suppuration between the dura mater and arachnoid, in consequence of blood having been effused in that situation.

Guy’s Hosp. Rep., 1, 36-40, London, 1836.

Bright was the first to describe unilateral (“Jacksonian”) epilepsy.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Epilepsy
  • 2217

Leçons sur les phénomènes physiques de la vie. 4 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 18361838.

Magendie, pioneer experimental physiologist, regarded pathology as only a modification of physiology, “medicine the physiology of the sick man”. By him clinical medicine was reconstructed on physiological lines.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works, PHYSIOLOGY
  • 1606

Hygiène publique. 2 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1836.

The first volume reprints the author's Essai sur les cloaques ou égouts de la ville de Paris (1824). Parent-Duchâtelet wrote that he had visited all the places which he described in the text: ”J’ai surmonté sans hésiter la répugnance et les dangers inséparables de pareilles recherches. ... J’ai fait tout ce que doit faire un homme jaloux de découvrir la vérité, et de jeter quelque lumière sur un sujet obscur."



Subjects: Hygiene, PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 1607

De la prostitution dans la ville de Paris. 2 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1836.

Traditionally viewed as a classic in public health, this work has also been characterized as the first scientific study in sexology. Third and most complete edition "complétée par des documents nouvelles et des notes" par A[dolphe] Trebuchet [1801-1865] and Poirat-Duval suivie d'un précis hygiénique, statistique et administratif sur la prostitution dans les principles villes de l'Europe. 2 vols, Paris, 1857. Digital facsimile of the 1836 edition from BnF Gallica at this link; of the 1857 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Hygiene, PUBLIC HEALTH, SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 1260

Vorläufige Mittheilungen microscopischer Beobachtungen über den inner Bau der Cerebrospinalnerven und über die Entwickelung ihrer Formelemente.

Arch. Anat. Physiol. miss. Med., 145-61, 1836.

Remak identified for the first time the myelinated fiber with its central “band of Remak” (the axon), and the unmyelinated axon or “fiber of Remak.” Fuller account in his Observationes anatomicae (No. 1262).



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, NEUROSCIENCE › NERVOUS SYSTEM › Peripheral Nerves / Nerve Impulses
  • 2077

Account of a method of separating small quantities of arsenic from substances with which it may be mixed.

Edinb. New phil. J., 21, 229-56., Edinburgh, 1836.

Marsh method for the detection of arsenic.



Subjects: TOXICOLOGY
  • 2123.1

On the influence of trades, professions, and occupations, in the United States in the production of disease.

Trans. Med. Soc. St. of N.Y., 3, 91-150., 18361837.

The first American work devoted entirely to occupational diseases. Reprinted with introduction, Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press, 1943.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), Economics, Biomedical, OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE
  • 2290

Lectures on the morbid anatomy of the serous and mucous membranes. 2 vols.

London: Sherwood & Simpkin, Marshall, 1836, 1840.

Important work which stimulated the study of tissue pathology in England. Hodgkin was the first in England to give a regular lecture course in morbid anatomy, which he began at Guy’s in 1827. Vol. 2, pt. 2 was never published.



Subjects: PATHOLOGY
  • 1737

Observations on manual strangulation, illustrated by cases and experiments.

West J. med. phys. Sci., 9, 25-38, 1836.

After performing an autopsy on a strangulation case, Gross set out to study the physiology involved in manual strangulation. He set up a series of experiments on dogs for this purpose and provides autopsy reports on each as well as guidelines for medical examiners investigating strangulations.



Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine)
  • 1738

Elements of medical jurisprudence.

London: Deacon, 1836.

The standard English work on the subject for generations, translated, expanded and used worldwide; thirteenth edition, Principles and practice of medical jurisprudence, appeared in 1984. Digital facsimile of the first edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine)
  • 1967

Traité de thérapeutique et de matière médicale. 2 vols.

Paris: Béchet jeune, 18361839.

“A valuable work of reference, containing a large amount of information on the various articles or the materia medica, collected from the best authorities, interspersed with much original matter” (Waring).



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS, THERAPEUTICS
  • 3115

Das Blut in mehrfacher Beziehung physiologisch und pathologisch untersucht.

Bonn: T. Habicht, 1836.

Nasse gave the first clear description of anemia in pregnancy; he also noticed erythrocyte sedimentation in certain pathological conditions.



Subjects: HEMATOLOGY › Anemia & Chlorosis
  • 3257

Ueber eine Form von Halsentzündung.

Med. Correspbl. württ. ärztl. Vereins, 6, 21-25, 1836.

Ludwig’s angina” first described. English translation and biographical note. Bull. Hist. Med., 1939, 7, 1115-26.



Subjects: DENTISTRY › Oral Pathology , OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (Ear, Nose, Throat)
  • 3717

Der Scorbut in geschichtlich-literarischer, pathologischer, prophylactischer und therapeutischer Beziehung.

Leipzig: E. Wartig, 1836.


Subjects: NUTRITION / DIET › Deficiency Diseases › Scurvy
  • 3617

Observations on jaundice.

Guy’s Hosp. Rep., 1, 604-37, 1836.

Original description of acute yellow atrophy of the liver.



Subjects: HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver
  • 3763

Commentatio de splenis hypertrophia et historia extirpationis splenis hypertrophici cum fortuna adversa.

Rostock, Germany: typ. Adlerianis, 1836.

While most people in Germany still considered splenectomy beyond the bounds of possibility, Quittenbaum performed the operation in 1829, establishing it as a surgical procedure.



Subjects: SURGERY: General , Spleen: Lymphatics
  • 2954

Case of a femoral aneurism, for which the external iliac artery was tied, with an account of the preparation of the limb, dissected at the extirpation of eighteen years.

Guy’s Hosp. Rep., 1, 43-52, 1836.

The artery was tied in 1808, and the patient died in 1826.



Subjects: VASCULAR SURGERY › Ligations
  • 2955

Account of the first successful operation, performed on the carotid artery, for aneurism, in the year 1808; with the post-mortem examination in 1821.

Guy’s Hosp. Rep., 1, 53-58, 1836.

See No. 2929.



Subjects: VASCULAR SURGERY › Ligations
  • 2956

Some experiments and observations on tying the carotid and vertebral arteries, and the pneumo-gastric, phrenic, and sympathetic nerves.

Guy’s Hosp. Rep., 1, 457-75, 654, 1836.


Subjects: VASCULAR SURGERY › Ligations
  • 2957

Femoral aneurism successfully treated by a ligature of the external iliac artery.

Guy’s Hosp. Rep., 1, 59-78, 1836.

Successful ligation of external iliac artery for femoral aneurysm, 1822.



Subjects: VASCULAR SURGERY › Ligations
  • 4290.1

Mémoire sur une manière nouvelle de pratiquer l’opération de la pierre… Terminé et publié par J.L. Sanson et par L.J. Bégin…

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1836.

Posthumously published by Sanson, whose method of rectovesical lithotomy is considered here along with the controversial method of lithotrity. Dupuytren tried both but dropped them in favor of continuing the method of bilateral lithotomy. which he invented in 1812, and which was adopted as the normal procedure, with later modifications.



Subjects: UROLOGY › Urinary Calculi
  • 3441

Glückliche Heilung nach Ausscheidung eines Theiles des Darms und Netzes.

Wschr. ges. Heilk., 401-13, 1836.

First account of a resection in which Lembert’s suture was successfully employed.



Subjects: GASTROENTEROLOGY › Esophagus: Stomach: Duodenum: Intestines, SURGERY: General › Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery
  • 3679.7

Guide to sound teeth or a popular treatise on the teeth, illustrating the whole judicious management of these organs from infancy to old age: In which the author will attempt to show that the teeth of all persons which are constitutionally well formed, and who enjoy good health may, by proper management and care, be preserved to the end of life.

New York: Wiley & Long, 1836.

An expansion of Shearhashub Spooner's 32-page dissertation, An inaugural dissertation on the pysiology [sic] and diseases of the teeth. Submitted to the examination of John Augustus Smith, M.D, president, and the trustees and professors of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of the University of the State of New York; and publicly defended for the degree of doctor of medicine, April 6th, 1835. New York: J.& W. Sandford, printers, 1835.  

John Roach Spooner (1794-1838) an American dentist living in Montreal, was the first to use arsenous acid to devitalize the pulp. This discovery was first published in the above work by his brother. Digital facsimile of the 1836 work from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: DENTISTRY
  • 3679.8

Der Schiefstand der Zähne.

Berlin: Ernst Siegfried Mittler, 1836.

The first specialized orthodontic work in German, on anomalous positions of the teeth. A French translation was issued simultaneously by the same publisher.



Subjects: DENTISTRY › Orthodontics
  • 4207

Cases and observations, illustrative of renal disease accompanied with the secretion of albuminous urine.

Guy’s Hosp. Rep., 1, 338-400; 1840, 5, 101-161, 1836.

As a result of greater experience on renal disease, Bright rounded off his work on the subject with the above paper, wherein he recorded his extended observations; by this time he had come to more definite conclusions, expecially with regard to the treatment of the condition. Bright’s papers on the subject were reprinted, London, 1937, edited by A. A. Osman.



Subjects: NEPHROLOGY › Renal Disease
  • 5743.1

Autoplastie, ou restauration des parties du corps, qui ont été détruites, à la faveur d’un emprunt fait à d’autres parties plus ou mains éloigneés.

Paris: Urtubie, 1836.

The first treatise on plastic surgery in general, criticised by Zeis (No. 5743.4) for its bias against the achievements of German surgeons. This is the first commerical edition. The work was published slightly earlier as a thesis with title, De l’autoplastie. Thèse présentée et soutenue…pour une chaire de clinique chirurgicale, Paris, Urtubie, 1836.



Subjects: PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY
  • 5023.1

Observations on continued fever, as it occurs in the city of Glasgow hospitals.

Edinb. med. surg. J., 45, 64-70, 1836.

Perry correctly described many of the distinctions between typhus and typhoid.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5207

Animalcules observés dans les matières purulentes et le produit des sécrétions des organes génitaux de l’homme et de la femme.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 3, 385-86, Paris, 1836.

First description of Trichomonas vaginalis, which Donné at first believed to be the pernicious agent in gonorrhoea. He later admitted the organism to be a normal inhabitant of the female genital tract. Donné was, by this work, the first to describe living organisms in pathological conditions, as observed by modern methods. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, MICROBIOLOGY
  • 7374

Ledetraad til Nordisk Oldkyndighed.

Copenhagen: S. L. Møller, 1836.

Thomsen's work established the "Three-Age system," according to which artifacts were first made of stone, then bronze, and then iron. This basic chronology underpins the archaeology of most of the "Old World.”  



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Cultural Anthropology, EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution
  • 7674

The anatomist's instructor, and museum companion; being practical directions for the formation and subsequent management of anatomical museums.

Edinburgh: Adam and Charles Black, 1836.

"Dr Frederick Knox was the librarian of New Zealand's first public library. He emigrated from Scotland in July 1840 and within days of arriving in Port Nicholson became involved in establishing the country's first public library.

"The library lasted for just one year before winding up and handing over its contents to another organisation. But Knox continued to contribute to the cultural development of the country until his death in 1873....

"Records suggest that Knox did not practise as a medical practitioner in New Zealand until after he moved to the Hutt Valley, where he practised between 1851 and 1855. After this time he held various medical positions, including Resident Medical Officer to the Asylum (Karori) from 1855 to 1857, and Coroner at Porirua from 1861 to 1862. But on his death in August 1873 he was best remembered for his contribution as a scientist...." (https://nzhistory.govt.nz/people/frederick-knox)

Knox was the brother of Robert Knox, who became notorious as the client of resurrection men, Burke and Hare.


Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › New Zealand, MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 9524

The Indian vegetable family instructer: Containing the names and descriptions of all the most useful herbs and plants that grow in this country, with their medicinal qualities annexed; also, a treatise on many of the lingering diseases to which mankind are subject, ... with a large list of recipes, which have been carefully selected from Indian prescriptions ... Designed for the use of families in the United States.

Boston, MA: The Author, 1836.


Subjects: NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 10352

Enchiridion medicum, oder Anleitung zur medizinischen Praxis. Vermächtniss einer fünfzigjärigen erfahrung.

Berlin: Jonas Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1836.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link. Translated into English by Caspar Bruchhausen and Robert Nelson as Manual of the practice of medicine: The result of fifty years' experience. London: Hippolyte Baiilière, 1844. Digital facsimile of the 1855 New York edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Ethics, Biomedical
  • 11309

On the brain of the negro, compared with that of the European and the orang-outang.

Phil. Trans., 126, 497-526, 1836.

In this very thoroughly researched, highly documented, and well-illustrated paper Tiedemann demonstrated that there are no significant anatomical differences between the brains and mental capacities of Black people and White people.

"I take the liberty of presenting to the Royal Society a paper on a subject which appears to me to be of great importance in the natural history, anatomy, and physiology of Man; interesting also in a political and legislative point of view. Celebrated naturalists, Camper, Soemmerring, and Cuvier, look upon the Negroes as a race inferior to the European in organization and intellectual powers, having much resemblance with the Monkey. Naturalists of less authority have exaggerated this opinion. Were it proved to be correct, the negro would occupy a different situation in society from that which has so lately been given him by the noble British Government. I propose in this treatise to examine more minutely the most important part of this doctrine, namely, the structure of the brain, the noblest part of the human body, in reference to its functions. A comparison between the brain of the Negro and that of the European and the Orang-Outang, hitherto much neglected, appeared to me most worthy of attention. I shall first of all try to answer the following two questions.

"1st, Is there any impotant and essential difference between the structure of the brain of the Negro and that of the European? and

"2ndly, Has the brain of the Negro more resememblance to that of the Orang-Outang than the brain of the European?

"Should our researches induce us to answer these questions in the affirmative, we should then have reason to consider the opinion given above as true, and founded in nature. Should we be able to pove the falsity of this opinion, we should then be allowed to consider it as a mere literary fancy....(pp. 497-98).

"The intellectual faculties of the Negroes do not in general seem to be inferior to those of the European and other races. Such of them as are not bodily and morally degraded by slavery and oppression, have a pleasing and open xpression of coutenance, and are of a gay and cheeful turn. They exhibit proofs of good natural capacity, good sense, wit and penetration....many instances of Negroes who made a cetain progress in the liberal arts and sciences, and distinguished themselves as clergymen, philosophers, amthematicians, philogians, hsitorians, advocates medical men, poets, and musicians. Many Negroes ahve distingusiehd themselves by their talents in military tacts and politics....

"The principle result of my researches on the brain of the Negro, is, that neither anatomy nor physiology can justify our placing them beneath the Europeans in a moral or intellectual point of view...." (p. 525).

Digital facsimile from the Royal Society at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy › Comparative Neuroanatomy, ANTHROPOLOGY › Craniology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Physical Anthropology
  • 11430

Discoveries in light and vision; with a short memoir containing discoveries in the mental faculties.

New York: G. & C. Carvill & Co., 1836.

The first work on vision written by a woman and published in the United States. Griffith published the work anonymously. 

"Griffith’s work had its start in print in 1834, when she published two articles on vision in David Brewster’s prestigious Philosophical Magazine: “Observations of the Vision of the Retina” (4: 43–46) and “Observations on the Spectra of the Eye and the Seat of Vision” (5:192–196). Both contributions appeared under her own name. Brewster, certainly a leading authority in the field of optics at the time, appended an editorial comment to the first article stating that some of the conclusions reached by Griffith were incorrect, but nonetheless he felt that her observations were interesting enough to be printed. Not one to take criticism well, Griffith led off her second article with an attack on Brewster, objecting that he had provided no evidence to back up his claim, and she, for one, continued to believe that she was correct in all particulars. In both the dedication and the preface of Discoveries in Light and Vision, Griffith acknowledges that her conclusions are often diametrically opposed to those held by the leading scientific men of the day, but she is convinced that their soundness will one day be acknowledged even by her harshest critics" (Joseph J. Felcone, private communication).

Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), OPHTHALMOLOGY , WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 11556

Nouvelles recherches sur le rhumatisme articulaire en général, et spécialement sur la loi de coincidence de la péricardite et de l'endocardite avec cette maladie, ainsi que sur l'efficacité de la formule des émissions sanguines coup sur coup dans son traitement.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1836.

"In this volume he [Bouillaud] irrevocably established the etiologic relationship between rheumatic fever and heart disease. Early reports on this relationship had been contributed by Pitcairn, Jenner, and Wells, but Bouillaud's exposition was more authoritative, comprehensive and accurate than theirs" (Willius & Dry, 125).

The merit of Bouillaud's clinical observations was somewhat vitiated by his method of cure: repeated bloodletting at short intervals.

Translated into English by James Kitchen as New researches on acute articular rheumatism in general; and especially on the law of coincidence of pericarditis and endocarditis with this disease, as well as on the efficacy of the method of treating it by repeated bloodletting at short intervals. Philadelphia: Haswell, Barrington, and Haswell, 1837.

Digital facsimile of the 1836 edition from Google Books at this link, of the 1837 edition from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Rheumatic Heart Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rheumatic Fever, THERAPEUTICS › Bloodletting
  • 11645

What is the use of the double brain?

Phrenological J. & Misc., 9, 608-611, 1836.


Subjects: Neurophysiology
  • 13037

Catalogue des oiseaux.

Arles: D. Garcin, 1836.

Catalogue of the collection of over 3400 New World, Africa, Asian, Australian and European stuffed birds gather by the ornithologist, botanist and politican, following the order of the display of these specimens in Laugier's gallery. The entire collection was dispersed at auction in 1837, the year before publication of Laugier's Nouveau recueil de planches coloriées d'oiseaux was completed. According to Sharpe's account of the collecting of the ornithology specimens in the natural history departments of the British Museum, the British Museum purchased one-tenth of the collection.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Natural History Museums / Wunderkammern, ZOOLOGY › Ornithology
  • 929

Ueber die im Blute enthaltenen Gase, Sauerstoffe, Stickstoff, und Kohlensäure.

Ann. Phys. Chem. (Leipzig), 12, 583-606, 1837.

First quantitative analysis of the blood gases. Magnus proved that the arterial blood contains a higher concentration of oxygen than venous blood and that the latter had a higher carbon dioxide content.



Subjects: HEMATOLOGY › Blood Gases, RESPIRATION › Respiratory Physiology
  • 539

Symbolae ad anatomiam villorum intestinalium, imprimis eorum epithelii et vasorum lacteorum.

Berlin: A. Hirschwald, 1837.

Henle first described the epithelia of the skin and intestines, and defined the structure and function of columnar and ciliated epithelium. He applied the term “epithelium” to all mucous membranes in the body. Modern knowledge of the epithelial tissues starts with Henle. English translation and commentary in L.J. Rather, P. Rather, & J.B. Frerichs, Johannes Müller and the nineteenth century origins of tumor cell theory, Canton, Mass.: Science History Publications, 1986.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Microscopic Anatomy (Histology), DERMATOLOGY, ONCOLOGY & CANCER
  • 804

Ueber den Herzstoss und die durch die Herzbewegungen verursachten Töne.

Med. Jb. k. Österr. Staates (Wien), N.F., 13, 227-266, 1837.

Skoda’s theory of the heart beat.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY
  • 4524

On the influence of electricity, as a remedy in certain convulsive and spasmodic diseases.

Guy’s Hosp. Rep., 2, 493-507, 1837.

First therapeutic employment of static electricity.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Diseases of the Nervous System, THERAPEUTICS › Medical Electricity / Electrotherapy
  • 673

Ueber Knorpel und Knochen.

Ann. Pharm. (Heidelberg), 21, 277-82., 1837.

Isolation of chondrin and glutin.



Subjects: BIOCHEMISTRY
  • 674

Vorlaüfige Mittheilung betreffend Versuche über die Weingährung und Fäulniss.

Ann. Phys. Chem. (Leipzig), 41, 184-93., Leipzig, 1837.

Proof that putrefaction is produced by living bodies. Independently of Cagniard-Latour, Schwann discovered the yeast cell. He is regarded as the founder of the germ theory of putrefaction and fermentation.



Subjects: BIOCHEMISTRY, BIOLOGY, MICROBIOLOGY, Zymology (Zymurgy) (Fermentation)
  • 1105

Microscopische Beobachtungen über die sichtbare Fortbewegung der Lymphkörnchen in den Lymphgefässen der Froschlarven.

Arch. Anat. Physiol. wiss. Med., 267-72, 1837.


Subjects: Lymphatic System
  • 482

Ueber die Visceralbogen der Wirbelthiere.

Berlin: Sittenfeld, 1837.

First description of the visceral arches in vertebrates.



Subjects: EMBRYOLOGY
  • 110

Mémoires pour servir à l’histoire anatomique et physiologique des végétaux et des animaux. 2 vols. and atlas.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1837.

Dutrochet asserted that respiration follows the same pattern in both animals and plants, showing that the minute openings on the surface of leaves (the stomata) communicate with lacunae in deeper tissue. He also demonstrated that only the green parts of the plant can absorb carbon dioxide, thereby transforming light energy into chemical energy. The Mémoires are a collection of all his more important biological papers.



Subjects: BIOLOGY, BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment
  • 2213

A treatise on the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the chest.

Dublin: Hodges & Smith, 1837.

Stokes, most prominent of the Irish school of medicine, established his reputation by his book on diseases of the chest. Important among its contents are his discovery of a stage of pneumonia prior to that described by Laennec as the first, his observations that contraction of the side has sometimes followed the cure of pneumonia and that paralysis of the intercostal muscles and diaphragm may result from pleurisy, and his employment of the stethoscope as an aid to the detection of foreign bodies in the air passages.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Pneumonia, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › Medical Instruments › Stethoscope, Medicine: General Works
  • 1396

Neueste Untersuchungen aus der Nerven-und Hirnanatomie.

Ber. Versamml. dtsch. Natuif. u. Aerzte, Prag, (1838), 15, 177-80, 1837.

Description of the “flask-shaped ganglionic bodies” known as “Purkinje cells”. Reprinted in his Opera Omnia, 1939, 3, 47-9. Also published in Oken’s Isis, 1838, pp. 582-84.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, NEUROSCIENCE › NERVOUS SYSTEM › Brain, including Medulla: Cerebrospinal Fluid
  • 1261

Beitrag zur mikroskopischen Anatomie der Nerven.

Königsberg: Gebrüder Bornträger, 1837.


Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, NEUROSCIENCE › NERVOUS SYSTEM › Peripheral Nerves / Nerve Impulses
  • 2611.1

Surgical observations on tumours, with cases and operations.

Boston, MA: Crocker & Brewster, 1837.

The first North American book on tumors, with 16 hand-colored plates by David Claypoole Johnston (1799-1865).



Subjects: Illustration, Biomedical, ONCOLOGY & CANCER
  • 2380
  • 5201

Practical observations on the venereal disease, and on the use of mercury.

London: Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1837.

“Colles’s law” is stated on. p. 304. Colles introduced small doses of mercury in the treatment of syphilis. He was Professor of Surgery at Dublin.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis
  • 3058

Peliosis rheumatica. In his Allgemeine und specielle Pathologie und Therapie, 2, 48-49.

1837.

“Schönlein’s disease” (purpura) first described. English translation in No. 2241.



Subjects: HEMATOLOGY › Blood Disorders
  • 3257.1

A treatise on the diseases and injuries of the larynx and trachea.

London: Longman, 1837.

“A clear exposition of diseases of the larynx as known before the invention of the laryngoscope”. (Scott Stevenson and Guthrie, see No. 3342).



Subjects: OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (Ear, Nose, Throat) › Laryngology
  • 3258

Traité pratique de la phthisie laryngée, de la laryngite chronique, et des maladies de la voix.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1837.

A laryngological classic. English translation, 1839.



Subjects: OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (Ear, Nose, Throat) › Laryngology
  • 3328
  • 5593

Practical surgery.

London: John Churchill, 1837.

In his day Liston was the most dexterous and resourceful surgeon in the British Isles. He was the first in the country to remove the scapula and the first – on 21 Dec. 1846 – to perform a major operation with the aid of an anesthetic. On p. 350 Liston suggested the use of a mirror which could be used for viewing edematous tumors of the larynx.



Subjects: OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (Ear, Nose, Throat) › Laryngology › Laryngoscopy, SURGERY: General
  • 2750

Akute idiopathische Herzentzündung. In his: Praktische Diagnostik, pp. 118-20

Berlin, 1837.

Sobernheim first used the term “myocarditis.”



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Myocarditis
  • 2958

A case of aneurism of either the ischiatic or gluteal artery, in which the right internal iliac artery was successfully tied.

Amer. J. med. Sci., 20, 13-15, 1837.

Second successful reported ligation of the internal iliac artery in the United States.



Subjects: VASCULAR SURGERY › Ligations
  • 3441.1

A treatise on the malformations, injuries and diseases of the rectum and anus. Text and atlas.

New York: French & Adlard, 1837.

The first American treatise on colon–rectal surgery.



Subjects: Colon & Rectal Diseases & Surgery
  • 5154

De la morve et du farcin chez l’homme.

Mém. Acad. roy. Méd. (Paris), 6, 625-873, 1837.

A classic contribution to the knowledge of glanders and farcy in man. Rayer showed that glanders is contagious but is not a form of tuberculosis. It begins with a thoroughly documented historical chapter. Digital facsimile of the separate edition published from the journal, from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Glanders
  • 5743.2

Case of deformity of the mouth, from a burn, successfully treated by Dieffenbach’s method.

Am. J. med. Sci., 20, 341-46., 1837.

Mutter was probably the first in America to perform plastic operations to correct deformities.



Subjects: PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY
  • 5743.3

Rhinoplastic operation.

Bost. med. surg. J., 16, 69-79, 1837.

The first rhinoplasty reported in the United States. For this Warren used the Hindu method, grafting the flap from the forehead of the patient.

Warren reported the first use of the Italian or Tagliacotian method (grafting the flap from the arm) in the U.S. in Bost. med. surg. J., 1840, 22, 261-69. The title of the 1840 paper was "Rhinoplastic operations. With some remarks on the autoplastic methods usually adopted for the restoration of parts lost by accident or disease". Jonathan Mason Warren was the son of John Collins Warren.



Subjects: PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY › Rhinoplasty
  • 5024

On the typhus fever which occurred at Philadelphia in the spring and summer of 1836; illustrated by clinical observations at the Philadelphia Hospital; showing the distinction between this form of disease and dothinenteritis, the typhoid fever with alteration of the follicles of the small intestine.

Amer J. med. Sci., 19, 289-322; 20, 289-322, 1837.

Gerhard, a pupil of Louis, correctly differentiated between typhus and typhoid. Part of his paper is reproduced in R. H. Major, Classic descriptions of disease, 3rd ed., 1945, p. 174.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5850.1

An inquiry into the possibility of transplanting the cornea, with the view of relieving blindness…

Dublin J. med. Sci., 11, 408-17, 1837.

Bigger, a Dublin surgeon, successfully grafted a cornea of one gazelle onto that of another. According to this paper, he first performed this operation in 1835 while he was “a prisoner with a Nomadic tribe of Arabs, about twelve or fourteen days’ journey from Grand Cairo”. By the time this account of his work was published by a “Mr. Swift”, Bigger had not attempted the operation on a human subject. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ocular Surgery & Procedures › Corneal Transplant, TRANSPLANTATION, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5851

Procéde pour écrire au moyen des points.

Paris, 1837.

Braille, himself blind, modified the system of elevated points first suggested by Charles Barbier in 1820 for enabling the blind to read. In 1837 he added symbols for mathematics and music to his six dot system.



Subjects: OPHTHALMOLOGY › Blind Education
  • 6173

An exposition of the signs and symptoms of pregnancy.

London: Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, 1837.

“Montgomery’s glands”, the sebaceous glands of the areola, were previously described by Morgagni. They are described, with his “tubercles” (the secondary areola seen in pregnancy) in the above work.



Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS
  • 6530

Essai sur l’histoire de la médecine belge avant le XIXe siècle.

Gand, Belgium: L. Hebbelynck, 1837.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Belgium
  • 6865

Wirkungen des Schlangengiftes, zum aerztichen Gebrauche vergleichend zusammengestellt. Mit einer Einleigung über das Studium der homöopathischen Arzneimittellehr.

Allentown, PA: A. & W. Blumer, 1837.

An early American homeopathic title on The Effects of Snake Poison Comparatively Arranged for Therapeutic Use.  Hering assumed an analogy between snake venom and bacterial toxins. He drew his work from provings and testing of several snake venoms.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy, TOXICOLOGY, TOXICOLOGY › Venoms, TOXICOLOGY › Zootoxicology
  • 7311

Note sur les ossements fossiles des terrains tertiaires de Simorre, de Sansan, etc., dans le département du Gers, et sur la découverte récente d’une mâchoire de singe fossile.

Comptes rendus de l'Académie des Sciences, 4, 85-93, 1837.

First published account of the discovery of the first anthropomorphic fossil ape. Lartet's discovery, made in 1836 at Sansan, was the first to challenge Cuvier’s assertion that both humans and apes were products of the present geological epoch; it opened Lartet’s mind to the possibility of discovering “antediluvian” human remains. The fossil was named Pithecus Antiquus by de Blainville in 1840 and later placed in the new genus Pliopithecus by Paul Gervais.



Subjects: COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Primatology
  • 7633

Musée d'anatomie de la Faculté de Médecine de Strasbourg, ou Catalogue méthodique de son cabinet d'anatomie physiologique, comparée et pathologique.

Strasbourg, France: F. G. Levrault, 1837.

Digital facsimile from BnF Gallica at this link. See also Ehrmann's Nouveau catalogue du musée d'anatomie normal et pathologique de la Faculté de Médecine de Strasbourg (1843) and his Notice sur les accroissements du musée d'anatomie pathologique de Strasbourg: Suivie d'un catalogue, formant le premier supplément de celui publié en 1843 (1846).



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 8209

An essay on the antiquity of Hindoo medicine, including an introductory lecture to the course of materia medica and therapeutics, delivered at King's College.

London: Wm. H. Allen, J. Churchill, 1837.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 8803

Notes on the medical topography of Calcutta.

Calcutta: G. H. Huttmann, Bengal Military Orphan Press, 1837.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, Cartography, Medical & Biological, Geography of Disease / Health Geography, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 9651

A descriptive and statistical account of the British Empire, exhibiting its extent, physical capacities, population, industry and civil and religious institutions. 2 vols.

London: Charles Knight & Co., 1837.

McCulloch indicated on the title page that he was "assisted by numerous contributors." Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.  Fourth edition, revised with an appendix of tables (2 vols., 1854). Digital facsimile of the 1854 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, Economics, Biomedical
  • 10107

The medical student; or, aids to the study of medicine. Including a glossary of the terms of the science, and of the mode of prescribing,--bibliographical notices of medical works; the regulations of different medical colleges of the union, &c. &c.

Philadelphia: Carey, Lea & Blanchard, 1837.

A remarkable survey of medical education in the U.S. at the time, with a thorough analysis of the different medical schools and the courses they offered, and an extensively annotated bibliography of 195 recommended medical books published in America in English or English translation. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession
  • 10411

The family nurse; or companion of the frugal housewife. Revised by a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society.

Boston, MA: Charles J. Hendee, 1837.

Child was was an abolitionist, women's rights activist, Native American rights activist, novelist, journalist, and opponent of American expansionism. Her journals, both fiction and domestic manuals, reached wide audiences from the 1820s through the 1850s. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), Household or Self-Help Medicine, NURSING, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 11467

The spirit of the woods, illustrated by coloured engravings. By the author of "The moral of flowers."

London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1837.

Little is known of the anonymous author of this early illustrated work on trees except that she was also "Mrs. William Hey" and had previously published The moral of flowers. The beautiful hand-colored plates presumably were reproduced from paintings by the author. She identified herself as "Mrs. Hey" in the expanded edition of 1849 retitled Sylvan musings, or the spirit of the woods.

Digital facsimile of the 1837 edition from the Hathi Trust at this link, of the 1849 edition at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Botanical Illustration, BOTANY › Dendrology, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 11697

Anatomia chirurgica truncorum arteriarum nec non fasciarum fibrosarum.

Dorpat (Tartu) Estonia: Revaliae Eggers, 18371841.

An atlas of arterial stems and fasciae. Translated into German as Chirurgische anatomie der Arterienstamme und Fascien neu Bearbeitet von Julius Szymanowski. Leipzig und Heidelberg: C. F. Winter, 1850. Digital facsimile of the 1850 edition from Bayerische StaatsBibliothek at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY › Anatomy of the Heart & Circulatory System
  • 11813

Histoire statistique et morale des enfants trouvés.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1837.

A thorough analysis of the problem of foundling children from a social, medical, legal and historical standpoint. The work begins with a history of the treatment of abandoned children from antiquity to the time of writing; this is followed by accounts of the various laws and institutions established for handling abandoned children in France and other countries. An entire section of the book discusses foundling hospitals, including the benefits and drawbacks of their operations; elsewhere, the authors describe the training of foundling children for employment in the military and in the French colonies. The book finishes with numerous tables giving statistics of births, exposures and deaths of foundling children in France, as well as monies expended on foundlings and the transfer of children in and out of foundling hospitals. Pp. 479-94 contains a bibliography of the principal works on foundling children published to the time of writing. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, PEDIATRICS, SOCIAL MEDICINE
  • 11879

Flora de Filipinas. Según el sistema sexual de Linneo.

Manila, Philippines: En la Imprenta de Sto. Thomas por D.Candido Lopez, 1837.

The first manual of Philippine botany published in the Philippines. The first two editions (1837 and 1845) were unillustrated. From 1877 to 1883 Celestine Fernandez Villar (1838-1907), together with others including Antonio Llanos, published an illustrated posthumous edition printed by C. Verdaguer of Barcelona.

Flora de Filipinas, según el sistema sexual de Linneo. Adicionada con el manuscrito inédito del. fr. Ignacio Mercado, las obras del fr. Antonio Llanos, y de un apéndice con todas las nuevas investigaciones botanicas referentes al archipiélago Filifino [sic]. Gran edicion. 4 vols. Manila: Establecimento Tipografico, 1877-1883.

Digital facsimile of the 1837 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Philippines
  • 12871

Handbuch der Zahnheilkunde: enthaltend Anatomie u. Physiologie, Materia Medica dentaria und Chirurgie. Nach eigen 43 Jar. Erfahrung und viefältigen Beobactungen dargestellt.

Berlin: Schlesinger'sche Buch- und Musikhandlung, 1837.

The first German handbook of scientific dentistry, a collaboration between the Linderers, father and son. Second edition, revised and expanded by Joseph Linderer, 2 vols, 1842. Digital facsimile of the 1842 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: DENTISTRY
  • 13056

Catalogue raisonné, or, classified arrangement of the books in the Library of the Medical Society of Edinburgh.

Edinburgh: Printed for the Society by Balfour and Jack, 1837.

 Classification by subject. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Institutional Medical Libraries, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Scotland
  • 13101

An examination of phrenology; in two lectures.

Washington, DC: B. Homans, 1837.

This may be the earliest work incorporating anatomical images that was written in opposition to phrenology. Sewall, a physician from New England, was a founding member of the medical department at Columbian College (now George Washington University) in Washington D.C., where he had relocated after being convicted of body-snatching in Massachusetts. A vocal opponent of phrenology, Sewall laid out his objections based on two lectures delivered before the students of Columbian College in 1837. The work is illustrated with images of horizontal and vertical sections of the brain and skull, together with a diagram of the phrenological "organs" of the brain / mind. Digital facsimile from U.S. National Librawry of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Phrenology
  • 540

Ueber die Ausbreitung des Epithelium im menschlichen Korper.

Arch. Anat. Physiol, wiss. Med., 103-28., 1838.

Henle broadened the scope of his study of epithelium (No. 539) to include the covering layers of the true body cavities.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY, DERMATOLOGY › Dermatopathology
  • 605

Sur le courant électrique ou propre de la grenouille.

Ann. Chim., 68, 93-106, 1838.

Matteucci established the difference of potential between injured nerve and its muscle.



Subjects: PHYSIOLOGY › Electrophysiology
  • 675

Mémoire sur la fermentation vineuse.

Ann. Cbim. Phys., 68, 206-22., 1838.

The earliest demonstration of the true nature of yeast was made by Cagniard-Latour in 1836. All his work on the subject is summed up in this paper. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIOCHEMISTRY, Zymology (Zymurgy) (Fermentation)
  • 676

Action de l’acide hydrochlorique sur la protéine.

Bull. Set. Phys. nat. (Leyde), 153, 1838.

Mulder gave the name protéine (protein) to a substance which he believed to be the essential constituent of all organized bodies. Later, with Liebig, he found there was no such definite compound, but the work remained to designate the nitrogenous products of which it was a mixture.



Subjects: BIOCHEMISTRY
  • 1156

Ueber die Entstehung der Glandula pituitaria.

Arch. Anat. Physiol. tviss. Med., 482-85, 1838.

Important description of the pituitary.



Subjects: Ductless Glands: Internal Secretion › Pituitary
  • 111
  • 2469

Die Infusionsthierchen als vollkommene Organismen. 1 vol. and atlas of 64 hand-colored engraved plates.

Leipzig: L. Voss, 1838.

In this monumental work in folio format Ehrenberg extended Otto Friedrich Müller’s bacteriological classification. Like Müller, he made no distinction between protozoa and bacteria, classing them both as infusoria. His classification included Bacterium, which he described and named in 1828, and published in 1830, Vibrio, Spirillum and Spirochaeta. The fine hand-colored plates in this book were drawn by Ehrenberg himself. Includes (p. 80) first description of B. subtilis.

Ehrenberg's book was translated into French with the atlas in reduced  8vo format and condensed to 8 uncolored plates, as Traité pratique du microscope, et de son emploi dans l'étude des corps organisés par le docteur L. Mandl; suivi de Recherches sur l'organisation des animaux infusoires par D.-C.-G. Ehrenberg. Accompagné de quatorze planches. (Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1839). Digital facsimile of the 1839 translation from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Spirillium, BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Vibrio , BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes, BACTERIOLOGY › Bacteria, Classification of, MICROBIOLOGY, ZOOLOGY › Protistology (formerly Protozoology)
  • 112

Beiträge zur Phytogenesis.

Arch. Anat. Physiol. wiss. Med., 137-76., 1838.

Schleiden demonstrated that plant tissues are made up of and developed from groups of cells, of which he recognized the “cytoblast” or cell-nucleus. He observed with great accuracy certain other activities of the cell, and is an important figure in the development of the cell theory. In keeping with other scientists of his time, he held that young cells develop spontaneously from the cytoblast, an acceptance of the theory of spontaneous generation. English translation (Sydenham Society) 1847.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Cell Biology, BOTANY
  • 112.1

Ueber die Analogie in der Structur und dem Wachsthum der Thiere und Pflanzen.

Neue Not. Geb. Nat. Heil., Jan. 33-36; Feb. 225-29; April 21-23., 1838.

Schwann’s three-part preliminary application of Schleiden’s “watch-glass” cell theory to the genesis of animal cells. Schleiden communicated the theory to him verbally. This paper actually pre-dates Schleiden’s first publication (No. 112) but Schwann gives Schleiden full credit for the Uhrglastheorie. English translation with commentary in L.J. Rather, P. Rather, and J.B. Frerichs, Johannes Müller and the nineteenth century origins of tumor cell theory, Canton, Mass., [1986].



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Cell Biology, MICROBIOLOGY
  • 1262

Observationes anatomicae et microscopicae de systematis nervosi structura.

Berlin: sumtibus et formis Reimerianis, 1838.

See No. 1260.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, NEUROSCIENCE › NERVOUS SYSTEM › Peripheral Nerves / Nerve Impulses
  • 145.57

Notice sur la loi que la population suit dans son accroissement.

Corresp. Math. et Phys., 10, 113-21., 1838.

Verhulst constructed the simplest mathematical model of a continously growing population with an upper limit to its size.



Subjects: COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology, DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics
  • 1498

Contributions to the physiology of vision.

Phil. Trans., 128, 371-94; 142, 1-17, 1838, 1852.


Subjects: OPHTHALMOLOGY › Physiology of Vision
  • 2291

Illustrations of the elementary forms of disease.

London: Longman, 1838.

Carswell was Professor of Morbid Anatomy at University College, London, and one of the leading English pathologists of his day. A fine artist, he personally painted 2,000 water-colours of pathological specimens. His great pathological atlas contains splendid hand-coloured lithographs which he selected from his collection of water-colours and personally drew on stone. Among the many pathologies illustrated was one of the first images of multiple sclerosis.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Degenerative Disorders › Multiple Sclerosis, PATHOLOGY, PATHOLOGY › Pathology Illustration
  • 2612

Ueber den feinern Bau und die Formen der krankhaften Geschwülste. Lief. 1.

Berlin: G. Reimer, 1838.

This classic work showed that Müller realized the necessity of the cell theory for the comprehension of the nature of cancer. He recognized cells, their nuclei and nucleoli, and could distinguish various types of tumors microscopically. Only Lieferung 1 of the book was published; C. West translated it into English in 1840. Improved translation with important commentary in L.J. Rather, P. Rather, & J.B. Frerichs, Johannes Müller and the nineteenth-century origins of tumor cell theory, Canton, Mass, Science History Publications, [1986].



Subjects: ONCOLOGY & CANCER
  • 2381
  • 5202

Traité pratique des maladies vénériennes.

Paris: De Just Rouvier & E. Le Bouvier, 1838.

Includes the description of “Ricord’s chancre”, the initial lesion in syphilis. Ricord re-demonstrated the specific character of syphilis and divided it into the three stages, primary, secondary, and tertiary. 

Repeating Hunter’s experiment, Ricord proved that syphilis and gonorrhoea were separate diseases. After Hunter, he was the greatest authority on venereal disease. 

The first of several English translations appeared in 1842.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis
  • 3587

Treatise on ruptures. 5th ed.

London: John Churchill, 1838.

This was the standard text for many years. It first appeared in 1807 as Treatise on hernia.



Subjects: SURGERY: General › Hernia
  • 4028

Abrégé pratique des maladies de la peau. 3me. éd.

Paris: Béchet jeune, 1838.

Laurent Théodore Biett (1781-1840), was a pupil of Alibert, Willan, and Bateman. His classic description of lupus erythematoides migrans (“Biett’s disease”) occurs on pp. 11 and 415 of the above work.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses
  • 4321

Beiträge zur operativen Orthopädik.

Hannover: Helwing, 1838.

Stromeyer is the founder of modern surgery of the locomotor system. He advocated and practised subcutaneous tenotomy for all deformities of the body arising from muscular defects.



Subjects: ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments
  • 4798
  • 4929

Des maladies mentales. 2 vols. and atlas.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1838.

Esquirol succeeded Pinel at the Salpêtrière, and was the first lecturer on psychiatry. After Pinel he was a founder of the French School. This is the first modern textbook on psychiatry. It is notable for its striking illustrations of the insane. Vol. 2, p. 264 contains a classic description of paresis. Esquirol regarded general paralysis as a complication of various forms of mental disorder. English translation, without the illustrations, Philadelphia, 1845, reprinted 1965.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Paralysis › General Paresis, PSYCHIATRY
  • 1739
  • 4929.01

A treatise on the medical jurisprudence of insanity.

Boston, MA: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1838.

The first authoritative and comprehensive treatise in English on forensic psychiatry. Ray became the most influential American writer on forensic psychiatry in the 19th century. He put the above work through five editions, the last of which appeared in 1871. Ray's book was deployed effectively by defense lawyer Sir Alexander Cockburn in the English trial of Daniel M'Naghten in 1843. At the trial, Cockburn quoted extensively from the book which rejected traditional views of the insanity defense based on the defendant's ability to distinguish "right from wrong" in favor of a broader approach based on causation. Reprint of 1st edition with introduction and notes by W. Overholser, Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Univ. Press, 1962. Digital facsimile of the 1st edition (1838) from Google Books at this link;  5th edition (1871) from Google Books at this link.

 

 



Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine), PSYCHIATRY › Forensic Psychiatry
  • 4415

Views and treatment of an important injury of the wrist.

Med. Examiner, 1, 365-68, 1838.

“Barton’s fracture” of the radius.



Subjects: ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Fractures & Dislocations, ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Hand / Wrist
  • 5743.4

Handbuch der plastischen Chirurgie. Nebst einer Vorrede von J.F. Dieffenbach.

Berlin: G. Reimer, 1838.

In this work Zeis introduced the term “plastic surgery”. The first half of the work covers the general principles of plastic surgery, and the first history of the subject. The second half describes the special operative techniques required for the individual parts of the body. Annotated English translation by T.J.S. Patterson, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1988. See No. 5767.



Subjects: PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY, PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY › History of Plastic Surgery
  • 5594

Traité d’anatomie chirurgicale et de chirurgie expérimentale. 2 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1838.


Subjects: SURGERY: General
  • 6008
  • 6312

De arte obstetricia morbisque mulierum quae supersunt. Ex apographo Friderici Reinholdi Dietz, nuper fato perfuncti primum edita.

Königsberg: Graefe et Unzer, 1838.

Greek editio princeps of Soranus, based on manuscripts Dietz discovered in Paris and Rome, and published after the early death of the editor. Soranus was the leading authority on the gynecology and obstetrics of antiquity. He recognized atresia of the vagina as being congenital or acquired from inflammation. He packed the uterus for hemorrhage and performed hysterectomy for prolapse. He described podalic version. Soranus also included full instructions on the care and management of infants.Translated into English, with an introduction by Oswei Temkin, with the assitance of Nicholson J. Eastman, Ludwig Edelstein, and Alan F. Guttmacher as Soranus' Gynaecology. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1956. Digital facsimile of the 1838 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.

 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY › Hysterectomy, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS, PEDIATRICS
  • 5852

Klinische Darstellungen der Krankheiten und Bildungsfehler des menschlichen Auges, der Augenlider und der Thränenwerkzeuge nach eigenen Beobachtungen und Untersuchungen. 4 pts.

Berlin: G. Reimer, 18381847.

This great color-plate atlas is probably the best summary of the knowledge of diseases of the eye prior to the introduction of the ophthalmoscope.



Subjects: OPHTHALMOLOGY › Diseases of the Eye
  • 5853

Guide pratique pour l’étude et le traitement des maladies des yeux. 2 vols.

Paris: Soc. Encyclographique des Sciences Médicales, 1838.

Carron du Villards taught ophthalmology in Paris; his book is one of the best of the period.



Subjects: OPHTHALMOLOGY , OPHTHALMOLOGY › Diseases of the Eye
  • 6174

Recherches d’anatomie et de physiologie sur le système vasculaire sanguin de l’utérus humain pendant la gestation, et plus spécialement sur les vaisseaux utero-placentaires.

Arch gén. Méd., 3 sér., 3, 165-94, 1838.

Jacquemier’s sign, diagnostic of pregnancy.



Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Pregnancy Tests
  • 6175

Die geburtshülfiche Auscultation

Mainz: V. von Zabern, 1838.

Pioneering work on obstetric auscultation, including the sounds of the foetal heart. English translation by C. West, London, 1839.



Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS, PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS › Auscultation
  • 6711

Medical portrait gallery. Biographical memoirs of the most celebrated physicians, surgeons, etc. etc. who have contributed to the advancement of medical science. 4 vols.

London: Fisher, Son & Co., Whittaker & Co, 18381840.

Includes engraved portraits as well as text. The text frequently contains extensively annotated bibliographies of key works of the physicans portrayed. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographical Classics, BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works)
  • 4458

Excision of the head of the femur for disease of the hip-joint. IN: S. COOPER: A dictionary of practical surgery. 7th ed., pp. 272-73

London, 1838.

White was the first to perform this operation, April 1821.



Subjects: ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Amputations: Excisions: Resections
  • 7672

Histoire des embaumements et de la préparation des pièces d'anatomie normale, d'anatomie pathologique et de l'histoire naturelle suivie de procédés nouveau.

Paris: Ferra, 1838.

Gannal discovered the efficacy of solutions of aluminum acetate and chloride for preserving anatomical preparations. His method of embalming involved injection of solutions of aluminum salts into the arteries. Translated into English with notes and additions by R. Harlan as History of Embalming and of preparations in anatomy, pathology, and natural history; including an account of a new process for embalming. (Philadelphia: Judah Dobson, 1840). Digital facsimile of the 1838 edition from the Internet Archive at this link. Digital facsimile of the 1840 translation from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, ANATOMY › Embalming, MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 8401

Herophilus. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Medicin.

Carlsruhe und Baden: Verlag der D.R. Marr'schen, 1838.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece › History of Ancient Medicine in Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Hellenistic
  • 10402

Botica general de los remedios esperimentados. Que á beneficio del público se reimprime por su original en Cadiz, en Sonoma, de la alta California: Por M. G. V.

Sonoma, CA: impreta [sic] del Gobierno, 1838.

The first medical book printed in California, a small 23-page pamphlet of folk or popular medicine. It was printed by Agustín V. Zamorano, the first printer in Alta California under Mexican rule before the region became part of the United States. Facsimile reproduction and partial translation in Robert J. Moes, The Zamorano press and the Botica: California's first medical book (Los Angeles: The Zamorano Club, 1988).



Subjects: Medicine: General Works, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE › California
  • 11117

Anatomie microscopique. Tome premier: Histologie. Atlas de cinquante-deux planches. Tome second: Histogénèse. Atlas de quarante planches. 2 vols.

J.-B. Baillière, 18381857.

This work was issued in parts over nearly 20 years. Parts concerned specific subjects and were sold separately. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link, and at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Microscopic Anatomy (Histology), MICROBIOLOGY, Microscopy
  • 11310

Anatomical cabinet, belonging to R. D. Mussey, M.D., Professor of Surgery in the Medical College of Ohio. Printed for the use of pupils.

Cincinnati, OH (?): [Privately Printed], circa 1838.

This 20-page pamphlet described Mussey's personal collection of anatomical and pathological specimens.  No place of printing or date of publication is indicated in the pamphlet; because of the reference to the Medical College of Ohio, the pamphlet would have been issued after Mussey moved to Cincinnati in 1838. Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE › Ohio
  • 11431

Barn-Yard rhymes; showing what opinions the turkey, the cock, the goose, and the duck, enterain of allopathia, homopathia, electro-galvanism and the animalcule doctrines.

New York: G. & C. Carvill & Co., 1838.

A critique of medical practice and procedures in 80 pages of rhymed couplets voiced by farmyard animals. Mary Griffith, who published these satirical poems anonymously, dedicated the work to the Philadelphia physician Nathanial Chapman, who she considered "one of the 'three good doctors.' "

Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine, Satire / Caricature & Medicine , WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 13036

Nouveau recueil de planches coloriées d'oiseaux, pour servir de suite et de complément aux planches enluminées de Buffon, édition en-folio et in 4to de l'Imprimerie Royale, 1770. Publié par C. J. Temminck. 5 vols.

Paris & Strasbourg, France: F. G. Levrault, 1838.

Though Baron Laugier was responsible for this publication, which was issued over a period of 18 years, but not formally published until 1838, the scientific work has been credited to Temminck. Describes about 800 species of birds on 600 hand-colored plates.
Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: ZOOLOGY › Ornithology
  • 13150

Clinique des maladies des enfants nouveau-nes.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1838.

The first work on the diseases of newborns and the first work on child neurology and pediatric neurosurgery.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Child Neurology, NEUROSURGERY › Pediatric Neurosurgery, PEDIATRICS › Neonatology
  • 541

De formatione granulosa in nervis aliisque partibus organismi animalis.

Wroclaw (Vratislava, Breslau): Typis M. Friedlaender, 1839.

In 1839 Purkynĕ was the first to use the term protoplasma, by which he described the embryonic ground substance. This fact is recorded in the inaugural dissertation of one of his students, J. Rosenthal.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Cell Biology, EMBRYOLOGY
  • 805

Nowe spostrzezenia i badainia w przedmiocie fizyologii i drobnowidzowéj anatomii.

Rocz. Wydzialu lekar. Univ. Jagiel, 2, 44-67, 1839.

The “Purkinjĕ fibres”; identification of the conductor system of the heart. Reprinted in his Opera omnia, 1939, 3, 52-63. German version in Arch. Anat. Physiol, wiss. Med., 1845, 281-95; English translation by W. W. Gull in Lond. med. Gaz., 1845, 36, 1066-69, 1156-58. Historical note by V. Kruta in Bull. N.Y. Acad. Med., 1971, 47, 351-7.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY › Anatomy of the Heart & Circulatory System, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY › Cardiac Electrophysiology
  • 4525

A case of disease in the posterior columns of the spinal cord.

Med.-chir. Trans., 23, 80-84, 18391840.

Stanley was the first to describe disease of the posterior columns of the spinal cord.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Diseases of the Nervous System, NEUROSCIENCE › NERVOUS SYSTEM › Spinal Cord
  • 992

Analyses comparées des alimens consommés et des produits rendus par une vache laitière.

Ann. Chim., 71,113-36, 1839.

The first analysis of foodstuffs and fertilizers. Boussingault made a balance of intake and outgo of nutrients in food and excreta.



Subjects: BIOCHEMISTRY › Metabolism, GASTROENTEROLOGY › Anatomy & Physiology of Digestion, NUTRITION / DIET
  • 483

Entwicklungsgeschichte der Natter (Coluber natrix).

Königsberg: Bornträger, 1839.

“Rathke’s pouch”, a diverticulum from the embryonic buccal cavity.



Subjects: EMBRYOLOGY
  • 2215

Elements of the practice of medicine. Vol. 1. (All Published.)

London: Longmans, 1839.

Originally issued in three parts from 1836 to 1839 when the authors were joint lecturers on medicine at Guy’s Hospital.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works
  • 1605.1

Die Krankheiten des höhren Alters und ihre Heilung. 2 vols.

Erlangen: Ferdinand Enke, 1839.

Canstatt’s book is one of the most important in the history of gerontology, summarizing all previous work on the subject. Suffering from tuberculosis, Canstatt himself only lived to the age of 43. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: GERIATRICS / Gerontology / Aging
  • 1396.01

Anatomie comparée du système nerveux. 2 vols. and atlas.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 18391857.

The first comprehensive systematic investigation of the mammalian brain. Leuret wrote vol. 1 without Gratiolet, who later became his collaborator, publishing vol. 2 and the atlas after Leuret’s death.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy › Comparative Neuroanatomy, NEUROSCIENCE › NERVOUS SYSTEM › Brain, including Medulla: Cerebrospinal Fluid
  • 113

Mikroskopische Untersuchungen über die Uebereinstimmung in der Struktur und dem Wachsthum der Thiere und Pflanzen.

Berlin: Sander, 1839.

Mainly devoted to the investigation of the elementary structure of animal tissues, Schwann’s Untersuchungen had an important bearing on the development of the doctrine of the cell structure of animal tissue. In this work Schwann discarded Schleiden’s Uhrglastheorie and put forward a theory of his own. In the same work he described the neurilemma, the “sheath of Schwann”. Schwann was Professor of Anatomy and Physiology at Liège. English translation (Sydenham Society), 1847. See M. Florkin, Naissance et déviation de la théorie cellulaire dans l’ceuvre de Theodore Schwann. Paris, Hermann, 1960. Digital facsimile of the 1839 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Cell Biology, MICROBIOLOGY
  • 1458

Ueber die Compensation der physischen Kräfte am menschlichen Stimmorgan, mit Bemerkungen über die Stimme der Säugethiere, Vögel und Amphibien.

Berlin: A. Hirschwald, 1839.


Subjects: COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, Speech, Anatomy and Physiology of
  • 1856

The elements of materia medica, comprehending the natural history, preparation, properties, composition, effects and uses of medicines. 2 vols.

London: Longman, 18391840.

The first great English work on the subject, widely published and used in England and America. Pereira was Professor of Materia Medica at the School of Pharmacy set up by the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.  Digital facsimile of the first edition from  the Hathi Trust at this link.

Pereira revised and expanded this work through four editions, the last of which appeared the year after his death. By its fourth edition the work was expanded to two volumes in three and the title was also expanded, somewhat grandiosely, to read "Fourth edition, enlarged and improved, including notices of most of the medicinal substances in use in the civilized world, and forming an encyclopedia of material medica."  Digital facsimile of the fourth edition from the Hathi Trust at this link.




Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Chemistry, Pharmaceutical, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, PHARMACOLOGY › Pharmacodynamics
  • 1857

Recherches sur la salicine et les produits qui en dérivent.

C. R. Acad. Sci., (Paris), 8, 479-85, 1839.

Piria made salicylic acid from salicin.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Willow Tree Bark (Salycilic Acid; Aspirin)
  • 1699

Vital statistics. IN: A statistical account of the British Empire: exhibiting its extent, physical capacities, population, industries, and civil and religious institutions by J[ohn] R[amsey] McCulloch, 2nd ed., 2, 52-90.

London: Charles Knight & Co., 1839.

Ranks with Graunt’s Observations as an original contribution to medical statistics. Significantly expanded from the first edition (1837).  Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics
  • 2098

Traité des maladies de plomb ou saturnines. 2 vols.

Paris: Ferra, 1839.

Classical description of the diseases found among lead workers. Reporting on 1200 cases of lead poisoning, Tanquerel’s studies were so complete that later studies added little to knowledge of the symptoms and signs of the disease. Translated into English by Samuel L. Dana as Lead diseases: A treatise from the French of L. Tanquerel des Planches with notes and additions on the use of lead pipe and its substitutes. Lowell, Mass.: Daniel Bixby and Company, 1848. Digital facsimile of the English translation from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE , TOXICOLOGY › Lead Poisoning
  • 2292

Elements of pathological anatomy. 2 vols.

Boston, MA: Marsh, 1839.

In his day Gross was the most famous surgeon in the U.S.A. He was for a time Professor of General Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathological Anatomy at Cincinnati Medical College and while there published his Elements, the first exhaustive, systematic study of pathological anatomy in English. Gross was the first to precede each description of the morbid anatomy of an organ with an account of its healthy color, weight, size and consistence founded on original research. The second edition of 1845 was considerably revised and enlarged, while the third edition of 1857 was abridged. Horner’s book (No. 2287) was the only important work on pathology to precede it in America.



Subjects: PATHOLOGY
  • 2676

Abhandlung über Perkussion und Auskultation.

Vienna: Witwe & Braumüller, 1839.

Skoda classified the various sounds obtained on percussion according to their musical pitch and tone. “Skoda’s resonance” is an important diagnostic sign in pneumonia and pericardial effusion. Following Skoda’s work, percussion at last gained general acceptance as a diagnostic procedure. Digital facsimile of the 1842 second edition from the Internet Archive at this link. English translation, 1853.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Pneumonia, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › Medical Instruments › Stethoscope, PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS › Auscultation, PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS › Percussion
  • 201

Crania Americana; or, A comparative view of the skulls of various aboriginal nations of North and South America. To which is prefixed an essay on the varieties of the human species.

Philadelphia: J. Dobson, 1839.

In his day Morton was the most eminent craniologist in the United States. He had a collection of nearly 1,000 skulls. In this work, which described both modern and fossil skulls, Morton described fractures and anthropogenic deformations. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY › Craniology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Ethnology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Latin America, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States (See also state listings under U.S.), PATHOLOGY › Paleopathology
  • 2585

Lectures on the blood, and on the changes which it undergoes during disease: Delivered at the College of France in 1837-8.

Philadelphia: Harrington, Barrington & Haswell & New Orleans: John J. Haswell & Co., 1839.

Pp. 244-49: Magendie showed that secondary or subsequent injections of egg/albumin caused death in rabbits who had tolerated an initial injection. This was the first experiment in anaphylaxis, though Jenner in 1798 had observed the phenomenon in various inoculations. These lectures were delivered at the Collège de France in 1837-38.

First published in English in the London Lancet, between the 29th of September, 1838, and the 16th of March, 1839. This is the first edition in book form.

"Lecture IX includes Magendie's description of cateterizing the right atrium as part of an experiment. This precedes his protegé Claude Bernard's use of the technique, has has been described by historians. Magendie explained, 'I now tie the lower end of the vessel, and proceed to make the same experiment; by way of comparison, on the venous system. The jugular has been laid bare. We must, in the case of this vessel, take some precautions that would have been useless when we acted on an artery....I have, therefore, selected a tube for the present experiment sufficiently long to reach into the thorax, as far as the vena cava superior, or even as the right auricle; while introducing it I heard a slight sibilus; my assistant also detects a strange sound in the chest; it is probably that a little air entered into the tube during inspriation, aslo reached the right cavities of the heart. This accident will, probably, not interfere materially with the progress of the experiment. The mercury marks, as before 65-75 mill. I fill the syringe, but with much greater difficulty than from the carotid; I am obliged to raise the piston forcibily in order to get the blood into the body of the instrument, whereas, in the former experiment, the impulse of the heart was sufficient to produce that effect.' This quotation from p. 85 documets Magendie's pioneering attempt to place a catheter in the right atrium. Claude Bernard would extend this technique under Magendie's supervision in 1844. Bernard's work culminated in a detailed description of the techniques to cathererize both sides of the heart in animals. See R. E. Siegel, 'Vascular catheterization during the 19th century: Claude Bernard's studies in animal heat,' Surgery, 55 (1964) 595-601" (W. Bruce Fye).

Digital facsimile from wellcomecollection.org at this link.

 



Subjects: ALLERGY › Anaphylaxis, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY, CARDIOLOGY › Interventional Cardiology › Cardiac Catheterization, HEMATOLOGY
  • 13

Oeuvres complètes d’Hippocrate. Traduction nouvelle avec le texte grec en regard, collationné sur les manuscrits et toutes les éditions: Accompagnée d'une introduction de commentaires médicaux, de variantes et de notes philologiques; suivie d'une table générale des matières par É[mile] Littré. 10 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 18391861.

The above bilingual edition was the result of 22 years of continuous labor, remains the most significant edition overall. For a detailed bibliography of modern editions and translations see Paul Potter, Short handbook of Hippocratic medicine, Quebec, 1988. Digital facsimile of the Littré edition from the Internet Archive at this link.

Between 1932 and 1934 Javal and Bourdeaux and Javal and Leblanc of Paris published an illustrated edition of the Littré translation in 4 volumes, with 64 color plates by Kuhn-Régnier in the art-deco style. This may be the only art book style illustrated edition of Hippocrates' complete works ever published.

 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology, Collected Works: Opera Omnia, Medicine: General Works
  • 2750.1

Rétrécissement avec oblitération presque complète de la portion thoracique de l’aorte.

Bull. Soc. anat. Paris, 14, 158-60, 1839.

Diagnosis of coarctation of aorta during life. Translation in Amer. J. Cardiol, 1965, 16, 253-55.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Aortic Diseases
  • 2751

Traité pratique des maladies du coeur.

Paris: J. Rouvier, 1839.


Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
  • 4259

A case of enlargement from melanoid tumour of the prostate gland, in a child of five years of age.

Med.-chir. Trans., 22, 218-21., 1839.

Sarcoma of the prostate was first recorded by Stafford.



Subjects: ONCOLOGY & CANCER, UROLOGY › Prostate
  • 4029

Zur Pathogenie der Impetigines.

Arch. Anat. Physiol. wiss. Med. 82, 1839.

The discovery of a fungus as the cause of favus (Achorion schönleinii). Schönlein communicated this important discovery in a letter of less than 200 words and one illustration. It represents the first conspicuous step in the attribution of disease to the action of minute parasites. Schönlein was the founder of modern clinical teaching in Germany.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses, Mycology, Medical, PARASITOLOGY › Parasitic Fungi
  • 3442

Mémoire sur la possibilité d’établir un anus artificiel dans la région lombaire sans pénétrer dans le péritoine.

Paris: Germer Baillière, 1839.

In 1839 Amussat performed the first lumbar colostomy for obstruction of the colon (“Amussat’s operation”). His work established lumbar colostomy as the method of choice. Translated in Dis. Colon. Rect., 1983, 26, 483-87. See No. 3443.



Subjects: Colon & Rectal Diseases & Surgery
  • 4322

Leçons orales de clinique chirurgicale. 2me. éd. Tom. 3.

Paris: Germer Baillière, 1839.

Pp. 455-61: Dupuytren was the first to treat wry neck by subcutaneous section of the sternomastoid muscle. This he did on 16 Jan, 1822. The operation was first reported in C. Averill: Short treatise on operative surgery, London, 1823, 61-64. See No. 5590.



Subjects: ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments
  • 4322.1

On the nature of club-foot and analogous distortions.

London: Jeffs, 1839.

Little suffered from club-foot himself. This is the greatest English classic on the subject. See No. 4329.



Subjects: GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Hereditary Disorders of the Skeleton › Clubfoot, ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Foot / Ankle, Podiatry
  • 4322.2

Operations on club-feet.

Boston med. surg. J., 21, 153-59, 1839.

Brown was the first surgeon in the United States to specialize in orthopedics, founding the Orthopedic Infirmary of the City of Boston (soon renamed the Boston Orthopedic Institution) in 1838. Brown was also the first in New England to popularize tenotomies for club–feet.



Subjects: GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Hereditary Disorders of the Skeleton › Clubfoot, ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Foot / Ankle, Podiatry
  • 3680

The dental art, a practical treatise on dental surgery.

Baltimore, MD: Armstrong & Berry, 1839.

One of the most popular books on the subject ever published. It underwent 13 editions during the next 74 years! Harris was instrumental in founding the first dental college in the world, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, as well as the first national association of dentists in the U.S., and the first authoritative dental periodical, the American Journal of Dental Science.



Subjects: DENTISTRY
  • 3681

On the structure, physiology, and pathology of the persistent capsular investments and pulp of the tooth.

Med.-chir. Trans., 22, 310-328, 1839.

“Nasmyth’s membrane”, or persistent dental capsule.



Subjects: DENTISTRY › Dental Anatomy & Physiology
  • 4208

Traité des maladies des reins. 3 vols, and atlas.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 18391841.

Rayer insisted on the exhaustive analysis of the urine as an aid to the diagnosis of lesions. He classified “albuminus nephritis” into six distinct forms and distinguished these from other forms of nephritis associated with infection, gout, rheumatism, and toxins. He noticed the existence of albuminuria in diabetes mellitus and also described the existence of renal vein thrombosis. His treatise on diseases of the kidney includes a spectacular color-plate atlas in folio format. The final chapter of the second volume of Rayer's text was translated into English by Diana Berry and Stewart Cameron as The history of albuminous nephritis,  with an introduction by Campbell Mackenzie. (London, 2005). See Gabriel Richet, "From Bright's disease to modern nephrology: Pierre Rayer's inovative method of clinical investigation", Kidney International, 39 (1991) 787-792.



Subjects: NEPHROLOGY › Renal Disease, NEPHROLOGY › Renal Disease › Nephritis, PATHOLOGY, PATHOLOGY › Pathology Illustration, RHEUMATOLOGY › Gout (Podagra)
  • 5517

Auffindung von Pilzen auf der Schleimhaut der Speiseröhre einer Typhus-Leiche.

Neue Notiz. Geb. Natur-u. Heilk. (Froriep), 12, cols. 145-47., 1839.

Discovery of Candida albicans, which Berg (No. 5518) showed to be the causal organism in thrush.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Candidiasis, Mycology, Medical
  • 6030

Case of vesico-vaginal fistula, successfully treated by an operation.

Amer. J. med. Sci., 24, 283-88, 1839.

Hayward’s successful treatment of vesicovaginal fistula was performed after Mettauer’s, although reported earlier.



Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY › Vesicovaginal Fistula
  • 5471

On dengue; its history, pathology, and treatment.

Philadelphia: Haswell, Barrington & Haswell, 1839.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever
  • 6257

Das schräg verengte Becken nebst einem Anhange über die wichtigsten Fehler des weiblichen Beckens überhaupt.

Mainz: V. von Zabem, 1839.

First description of the obliquely contracted pelvis, or “Naegele pelvis”. Because of its rarity and the difficulty of recognizing it clinically in living subjects, the obliquely contracted pelvis, with its most often fatal consequences at delivery, was unknown until Naegele’s study of 37 cases. He suggested diagnostic aids for its recognition. English translation, Manchester, 1848. Finely printed centennial English translation by Pynson Printers, 1939.



Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Pelvis: Pelvic Anomalies
  • 6258

Beyträge zur Kenntniss der Rückgrathskrümmungen, und der mit demselben zusammentreffenden Abweichungen des Brustkorbes und Beckens.

Med Jb. österr. Staates, 19, 41, 195, 1839.

Original description of spondylolisthesis.



Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Pelvis: Pelvic Anomalies
  • 3443

Opération d’anus artificiel, par la méthode de Littre, sur un homme adulte qui a survécu vingt-huit jours. In: Amussat, J. Z., Mémoire sur la possibilité d’établir un anus artificiel

pp. 85-88, Paris, 1839.

Pillore performed caecostomy in 1776, the patient surviving 28 days. Amussat went to considerable trouble to find the document describing the operation. See No. 3442.



Subjects: Colon & Rectal Diseases & Surgery
  • 7438

Journal of researches into the geology and natural history of the various countries visited by H. M. S. Beagle ....

London: Henry Colburn, 1839.

Darwin’s first published book, now universally known as The Voyage of the Beagle, is the most often read and the most often printed of all his works, after On the origin of species. Its relation to the background of Darwin's evolutionary ideas has often been stressed.

The traditionally identified first issue forms the third volume of The Narrative of the Voyages of H. M. Ships Adventure and Beagle, edited by Captain Robert Fitzroy and published, in three volumes and an appendix to Volume II, in 1839 in London by Henry Colburn. In its first separate issue, also in 1839, it was called Journal of Researches into the Geology and Natural History. Whether the separate version was issued simultaneously with the set, or slightly later is unknown, as both were advertised in the same set of advertisements in August 1839. The text and maps of the separate version are identifical to the set except that pp. i-iv of the preliminaries are cancels and [v-vi], the original volume title, is discarded.

Though Darwin tended to discard or disperse the manuscripts of his later works after they were published, in some cases giving sheets to his children for use as scrap paper, he saved the  original autograph manuscript for this work, and it is preserved at Down House. The manuscript was reproduced in facsimile by Genesis Publications, London, 1979.

 



Subjects: BIOLOGY, EVOLUTION, NATURAL HISTORY, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 9305

Lectures on the science of human life. 2 vols.

Boston, MA: Marsh, Capen, Lyon and Webb, 1839.

The Reverend Sylvester Graham was an American Presbyterian minister and dietary reformer known for his emphasis on vegetarianism, the temperance movement, and eating whole-grain bread.

"Around 1829, Graham invented the Graham diet, which consisted mainly of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole wheat and high fiber foods, and excluded meat and spices altogether (see vegetarianism). Very fresh milk, cheese, and eggs were permitted in moderation, and butter was to be used "very sparingly".[8]

"Graham believed that adhering to the diet would prevent people from having impure thoughts and in turn would stop masturbation (thought by Graham to be a catalyst for blindness and early death[9]:16) among other things. He was a prolific writer and speaker for his cause, which was sternly opposed to "bad habits" of the body and mind. During the 1830s, the diet had a moderate response, mostly from the puritanical faction of the American public. At one point it was strictly imposed on students of Oberlin College by David Campbell (a disciple of Graham's). During the period in which it was enforced, some rebellious students ate off-campus, and at one point a professor was fired for refusing to stop bringing his own pepper for use with his meals. The diet was eventually dropped by the college in 1841 following a public outcry.

"Grahamites, as Graham's followers were called, accepted the teaching of their mentor with regard to all aspects of lifestyle.[7] As such, they practiced abstinence from alcohol, frequent bathing, daily brushing of teeth, vegetarianism, and a generally sparse lifestyle. Graham also was an advocate of sexual abstinence, especially from masturbation, which he regarded as an evil that inevitably led to insanity. He felt that all excitement was unhealthful, and spices were among the prohibited ingredients in his diet. As a result, his dietary recommendations were inevitably bland, which led to the Grahamites consuming large quantities of graham crackers, a concept inspired by Graham's teachings. White bread was strongly condemned by Graham and his followers, however, as being essentially devoid of nutrition, a claim echoed by dietitians ever since. Some Grahamites lost faith when their mentor died at the age of fifty-seven. Other than the crackers, the Grahamites' major contribution to American culture was probably their insistence on frequent bathing. However, Graham's doctrines found later followers in the persons of Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and his brother Will Keith Kellogg. Their invention of corn flakes was a logical extension of the Grahamite approach to nutrition.

"Grahamism was influential in the vegan movement. Sylvester Graham focused on meat and milk, which he believed to be the cause of sexual urges. In fact, he claimed animal byproducts produced lust; Grahamism thus rejected meat, animal byproducts, and alcohol in order to develop a purer mind and body" (Wikipedia article on Sylvester Graham, accessed 03-2017).

Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.

 



Subjects: Hygiene, NUTRITION / DIET, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 10003

Deadly adulteration and slow poisoning unmasked; or, Disease and death in the pot and the bottle; in which the blood-empoisoning and life-destroying adulterations of wines, spirits, beer, bread, flour, tea, sugar, spices, cheese-mongery, pastry, confectionary medicines, &c. &c. &c. are laid open to the public, with tests or methods for the ascertaining and detecting the fraudulent and deleterious adulterations and the good and bad qualities of those articles: with an exposé of medical empiricism and imposture, quacks and quackery, regular and irregular, legitimate and illegitimate: and the frauds and mal-practices of the pawn-brokers and madhouse keepers. New edition. By an enemy to fraud and villany.

London: Sherwood, Gilbert & Piper, circa 1839.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: Crimes / Frauds / Hoaxes, PUBLIC HEALTH, Quackery, TOXICOLOGY
  • 10589

Physiognomice pathologica – Krankenphysiognomik. Text in quarto; atlas in folio with 72 hand-colored lithographs.

Stuttgart: L. F. Rieger & Freiburg im Breisgau : Herder, 1839.

 A second edition in octavo format with 80 small plates was published in 1842. Baumgärtner, a pupil of Friedrich Tiedemann and Leopold Gmelin at Heidelberg, taught that it was possible to make a correct diagnosis with accompanying medical treatment by studying the patient’s physiognomy, the expression of the face, the color of the skin, the eyes, the lips, etc . The 8vo edition was reprinted in 1929.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Physiognomy, PATHOLOGY › Pathology Illustration
  • 11546

Recherches sur l'introduction accidentelle de l'air dans les veines, et particulièrement sur cette question: L'air en s'Introduisant spontanément par une veine blessée pendant une opération chirurgicale, peut-il causer subitement la mort?

Paris: Germer Baillière, 1839.

Amussat was one of the first to draw attention to the risks of the introduction of venous air embolism in surgery. Before the introduction of anesthesia surgery was particularly rapid by necessity, and veins were often opened in the rush to complete operations.

Digital facsimile from BnF Gallica at this link.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Thrombosis / Embolism
  • 11763

The zoology of Captain Beechey's voyage; compiled from the collections and notes made by Captain Beechey, the officers and naturalist of the expedition, during a voyage to the Pacific and Behring's Straits performed in His Majesty's Ship Blossom, under the command of Captain F. W. Beechey...in the years 1825, 26, 27, and 28. By J. Richardson, N.A. Vigors, G.T. Lay, E.T. Bennett, Richard Owen, John E. Gray, Rev. W. Buckland, and G. B. Sowerby. Illustrated with upwards of fifty finely coloured plates by Sowerby.

London: Henry G. Bohn, 1839.

Includes 44 hand-colored plates engraved by J.C. Zeiter and Thomas Landseer after Edward Lear, J. D. C. Sowerby, and J. C. Zeitter,  four hand-colored engraved maps and plans (one folding) after E. Belcher. Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists, ZOOLOGY
  • 12011

Anatomical, pathological and therapeutic researches on the yellow fever of Gibraltar of 1828, by P. Ch. A. Louis. From observations taken by himself and M. Trousseau as memebers of the French Commission at Gibraltar. Translated from the manuscript by G. C. Shattuck.

Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1839.

The Translator's Introduction begins as follows: "The work now presented to the public has heretofore existed in manuscript only. Circumstances have delayed its publication in France, and some years may yet elapse before it appears in that country..."

Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Gibraltar, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever
  • 12127

First annual report of the Registrar-General on births, deaths, and marriages in England.

London: Printed by W. Clowes for Her Majesty's Stationery Office & Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1839.

In 1836 the Births and Deaths Registration Act was passed in England with provisions for inquiry into causes of death in the population, and registration began during the following year through the General Registration Office, directed by the Registrar-General. In 1839, William Farr was appointed compiler of abstracts in the Registrar-General’s office, and he, probably more than anyone else, developed and analyzed mortality statistics to delineate the sanitary and health problems of the day. This was the first of several annual reports to which William Farr contributed. His report, dated 6 May 1839,  was entitled "Letter to the Registrar-General from William Farr, Esq." Summarizing "the recorded causes of 141,607 deaths" registered in England and Wales during the half-year ending on December 31st, 1837, it appeared on pp. 86-118 of the Report. Digital facsimile of this and later annual reports from the Registrar-General from the Hathi Trust at this link.

A summary of Farr's report was published in the Journal of the Statistical Society of London, 2 (1839) 269-274 as "First annual report of the Registrar-General on births, deaths, and marriages in England, in 1837-8." The reviewer complimented Farr's analysis for providing the statistics as well as the deductions; the statistics would enable Farr's deductions to be tested, and used in further comparisons and calculations.

Digital facsimile of the summary from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: DEATH & DYING › Mortality Statistics, DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics
  • 12222

Cases of spasmodic disease accompanying affections of the pericardium.

Med.-chir. Trans., 22, 1-19, 1839.

Digital facsimile of the separate offprint from wellcomecollection.org at this link.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Rheumatic Heart Disease
  • 12931

American Library of Dental Science. 10 vols.

Baltimore, MD: American Society of Dental Surgeons, 18391850.

This was a series of American editions, and first English translations, of then-standard or classic works, most of which remain classics in dental literature. The volumes were listed by Weinberger (1938) as follows:

Vol. 1: Hunter, John. The natural history of the human teeth, etc. With notes by Eleazar Parmly. 1839. -Hunter, John. A practical treatise on the diseases of the teeth. 1839. -Brown, Solyman. A poem on the diseases of the teeth and their proper remedies. With notes by Eleazar Parmly. 1840.

Vol. 2: Baumes, M. A treatise on first dentition and the frequently serious disorders which depend upon it. Translated from the French by Thomas E. Bond, Jr. 1841. -Koecker, Leonard. Principles of dental surgery. 1842.

Vol. 3: Nasmyth, Alexander. Researches on the development, structure, and diseases of the teeth. 1842. -Gariot, J. B. A treatise on the diseases of the mouth. Translated from the French by J. B. Savier. With notes by the editors of The American Journal of Dental Science. 1843. 

Vol. 4: Berdmore, Thomas. A treatise on the disorders and deformities of the teeth, etc. 1844. -Jobson, David Wemyss. A treatise on the anatomy and physiology of the teeth, etc. 1844.

Vol. 5: Lefoulon, J. A new treatise on the theory and practice of dental surgery. Translated from the French by Thomas E. Bond, Jr. 1844.

Vol. 6: Blandin, Ph. Fr. Anatomy of the dental system, human and comparative. Translated from the French by Robert Arthur. 1845. -Delabarre, C. F. A treatise on second dentition, etc. Translated from the French by (anonymous, but supposed to be) Chapin A. Harris, 1845. -Waite, George. A critical inquiry into a few facts connected with the teeth. 1846.

Vols 7 and 8: Desirabode, M., assisted by his sons, etc. Complete elements of the science and art of the dentist. Translated from the Ffench by (anonymous, but supposed to have been) P. H. Austen, 1849. 

Vol. 9: Blake, Robert. An essay on the structure and formation of the teeth in man and various animals. Revised and corrected. With notes by C. O. Cone. 1848. -Duval, J. R The youth's dentist, etc. Translated from the French by J. Atkinson. 1848.

Vol. 10: Jourdain, M. A treatise on the diseases and surgical operations of the mouth and parts adjacent, etc. Translated from the French by (anonymous, but supposed to have been) P. H. Austen, 1849. -Bond, Thomas E. A practical treatise on dental medicine, etc. 1850. This does not appear in v. 10 as part of the library, but is usually credited as such.

Digital facsimiles of the volumes in this series are available from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: DENTISTRY
  • 13013

A synopsis of the birds of North America.

Edinburgh: Adam and Charles Black & London: Longman, Rees, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1839.

This was Audubon's extensively annotated systematic index, or a kind of scientific outline, to the double elephant folio, Birds of America. With 359 pages it amounted to a separate work, and could be studied without access to the images.  Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: ZOOLOGY › Ornithology