An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15422 entries, 13278 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 15, 2021

GALEN, [Κλαύδιος Γαληνός; Galen of Pergamon]

79 entries
  • 6900

The Syriac Galen palimpsest.

Ras al-Ayn, Syria, circa 850.

This ninth century palimpsest codex contains as its undertext a text of Galen's On Simple Drugs in the Syriac translation by Sergius of Reshaina. It has not yet been formally published. For further information see the entry in HistoryofInformation.com at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS
  • 12809

Liber Serapionis agregatus in medicinis simplicibus. Translatio Symois Januensis interprete Abraa iudeo tortuosiesi de arabico in latinu. Add: Galenus: De virtute centaureae.

Milan: Antonius Zarotus, 1473.
"Serapion the Younger ... is called "the Younger" to distinguish him from Serapion the Elder, aka Yahya ibn Sarafyun, an earlier medical writer with whom he was often confused. Serapion the Younger's Simple Medicaments was likely written in Arabic, but no Arabic copy survives, and there is no record of a knowledge of the book among medieval Arabic authors.[1] The book was translated to Latin in the late 13th century and was widely circulated in late medieval Latin medical circles.[2] Portions of the Latin text make a good match with portions of a surviving Arabic text Kitab al-adwiya al-mufrada attributed to Ibn Wafid (died 1074 or 1067).[3] The entire Latin text is very heavily reliant on medieval Arabic medicinal literature; and it is essentially just a compilation of such literature. It is exceedingly clear that the book was not originally written in a Latin language.[2]

"In the title Simple Medicaments, "simple" means non-compound: a practical medicine most often consisted of a mix of two or more "simples". The work was written for physicians and apothecaries. In the book's early part, Serapion the Younger classifies substances according to their medicinal properties, and discourses on their actions.[5] The remainder and largest part of the book is a compendium of information on individual medicaments quoted from DioscoridesGalen, and numerous named medieval Arabic writers on medicaments, with relatively brief supporting remarks by himself" (Wikipedia article on Serapion the Younger, accessed 5-2020).

ISTC No. is00467000. Digital facsimile from the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek at this link.


Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 52

Articella seu opus artis medicinae. Con: Johannitius: Isagoge ad tegni Galeni. Philaretus: De pulsibus; Theophilus Protospatharius: De urinis. Hippocrates: Aphorismi (comm: Galenus; tr: Constantinus Africanus); Prognostica (comm: Galenus); De regimine acutorum morborum (comm: Galenus; tr: Gerardus Cremonensis). Galenus: Liber Tegni, sive Ars medica (comm: Hali; tr: Gerardus Cremonensis).

Padua: Nicolaus Petri, 1476.

A collection of Greek, Roman and Byzantine texts on medicine, written in Latin, that was mainly used as medical school textbook or reference manual between the 13th and 16th centuries. The Articella grew around a synthetic exposition of classical Greek medicine written in Baghdad by the Nestorian Christian Hunayn bin Ishaq (Johannitius), who frequently translated from Greek to Syriac to Arabic. His synthesis was based on Galen's Ars medica (Techne iatrike; Questions on medicine for students) and thus became known in Europe as Isagoge Ioannitii ad tegni Galieni. The collection includes works of Hippocrates, Galen,Theophilus Protospatharius, Johannitius, and the Byzantine physician Philaretus. As a medical library in one convenient volume, which underwent six editions in the 15th century and many other editions in the first half of the 16th century, the work reflects changing attitudes to various ancient texts and translations through the evolution of its contents.  ISTC no. ia01142500. Digital facsimile from the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, BYZANTINE MEDICINE, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE
  • 6313

Liber ad Almansorem sive Tractatus medicinae I-X. Add: Liber divisionum; De aegritudinibus juncturarum; De aegritudinibus puerorum; De secretis sive aphorismi; De sectionibus et ventosis; Synonyma. Galenus: De medicinis experimentatis. Mesue (the elder): Aphorismi. Hippocrates: secreta; Capsula eburnea; De humana natura; De aere et aqua et regionibus; De pharmaciis. Tabula de herbis medicis.

Milan: Leonardus Pachel and Uldericus Scinzenzeler, 1481.

Rhazes was the first to devote an entire treatise to diseases of children. Although he lived so many years before the advent of printing, he was still regarded as an authority in the 15th century and his works were among the earliest medical books to be printed. Sudhoff included the above work in his Erstlinge der pädiatrischen Literatur, Munich, 1925.  ISTC No. ir00175000.

As with several 15th century printed medical compendia, this work contains texts by authors in addition to Rhazes, including Galen, and Hippocrates.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, PEDIATRICS, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 8438

Galeni Opera. Edited by Diomedes Bonardus. Translated from the Greek by Nicolaus de Regio, Marcus Toletanus, Petrus de Abano, Accursius Pistoriensis, Guilelmus de Moerbeka, Burgundio of Pisa, Gerardus Cremonensis and Constantinus Africanus. With poem to the author of Johannes Pyrrhus Pincius. 2 vols.

Venice: Philippus Pincius, 1490.

The first printed edition of Galen's writings pulled together texts from numerous translators. ISTC No. ig00037000. Digital facsimile from the Bayerische StaatsBibliothek at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, Collected Works: Opera Omnia
  • 1790

Breviarium medicinae. Tr: Gerardus Cremonensis. Add: Serapion the Younger: In medicinis simplicibus. Tr: Simon a Cordo Januensis and Abraham Judaeus Tortuosiensis. Galenus: De virtute centaureae; Johannes Platearius: Practica brevis; Matthaeus Platearius: De simplici medicina "Circa instans".

Venice: Bonetus Locatellus, for Octavianus Scotus, 1497.

Serapion the Elder and Serapion the Younger were Syrian Christians who wrote in Arabic. Breviarum medicinae was an abridgement of the opinions of the Greek and Arabic physicians concerning diseases and their treatment. It also includes transcriptions from Alexander of Tralles, an author with whom few of the other Arabic writers seem to have been much acquainted.

Matthaeus Platearius, a physician from Salerno, is thought to have produced a twelfth-century Latin manuscript on medicinal herbs titled "Circa Instans" aka ("The Book of Simple Medicines"), later translated into French as "Le Livre des simples medecines." It was an alphabetic listing and textbook of simples that was based on Dioscorides "Vulgaris", which described the appearance, preparation, and uses of various drugs. Matthaeus Platearius and his brother Johannes were the sons of a female physician from the Salerno school who was married to Johannes Platearius I; it is possible that she was Trotula. ISTC No. is00466000. Digital facsimile from the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, BYZANTINE MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy › Schola Medica Salernitana, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 53

Aphorismi secundum doctrinam Galeni. Add: Johannes Damascenus [Mesue?]: Aphorismi. Hippocrates: Secreta; Prognosticatio secundum lunam; Capsula eburnea; De humana natura; De aere et aqua et regionibus; De pharmaciis; De insomniis. Avenzohar: De curatione lapidis.

Venice: Johannes Hammon, 1500.

An edition of the Latin translation of Maimonides’ Aphorismi (first published, Venice, 1489), together with a compilation of the works of Mesue, Avenzoar, Galen, etc. Page for page reprint, Venice, 1508. See No. 6495.7. ISTC No. im00078000.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, Jews and Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Jewish Medicine, Medicine: General Works
  • 11081

Methodus medendi [and Ad Glauconem.]

Venice: Z. Callierges for Nicolaus Blastos, 1500.

Klebs 433.1. These were the first genuine texts of Galen published in print in the original Greek.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 2269

Galen: De affectorum locorum notitia libri vi.

Paris: Officina Henrici Stephani , 1513.

First separate dated Latin translation of De locis affectis, made by Wilhelm Copp of Basel. In this work devoted to pathology, Galen made many valuable deductions on inflammation and on tumors. He was familiar with cholera, hydrophobia, and malaria, the relations of urinary calculi to the kidney, ureter, and bladder. He recognized bronchitis, empyema, consumption, and pyuria. English translation by Rudolph E. Siegel, Basel, 1976.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, NEPHROLOGY › Renal Disease › Renal Calculi (Kidney Stones), PATHOLOGY
  • 2664

Galen: De differentiis morborum libri ii…

Paris: Officina Henrici Stephani , 1514.

First Renaissance Latin translation by Niccolò Leoniceno of Vicenza of Galen's work on physical diagnosis.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS
  • 6944

Galeni de sanitate tuenda libri sex.

Paris: Guillaume le Rouge, 1517.

First separate dated Latin translation of Galen's De sanitate tuenda (On the preservation of health), which contained his views on maintaining health and hygiene and preventing disease. Translated from the Greek by Thomas Linacre.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, Hygiene, PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 1959
  • 6943

Galeni methodus medendi, vel de morbis curandis.

Paris: Didier Maheu for Godefrid Hittorp, 1519.

The first separately published Latin translation from the Greek by Thomas Linacre. Galen's Method of medicine was a systematic and comprehensive account of the principles of treating injury and disease and one of Galen’s greatest and most influential works. Enlivening the detailed case studies Galen presented are many theoretical and polemical discussions, acute social commentary, and personal reflections. The British physician, scholar and humanist Linacre was one of the first Englishmen to study Greek in Italy and to bring the "new learning" of Renaissance humanism back to his native land. As few English printers issued books in Latin, Linacre had his translation published in France. It was reprinted many times during the 16th century. Reflecting demand for the work, the Greek editio princeps of Methodus medendi was published at Venice from the press of Z. Callierges in 1500--one of the earliest of Galen's works to appear in the original Greek. Books 3-6 of the 14 were published in an English translation by T. Gale, in London, 1566. The complete Method of medicine was translated into English by Ian Johnston and G. H. R. Hosley for the Loeb Classical Library, 3 vols., Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2011.

Galen’s shorter textbook on these subjects, Ad Glauconem de medendi methodo, was translated into French by C. Daremberg in Oeuvres anatomiques, physiologiques et médicales de Galien, Paris, 1856, 2, 706-784.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, THERAPEUTICS
  • 2665

De morborum symptomatis.

London: R. Pynson, 1522.

This volume of Galen’s selected works includes Thomas Linacre’s Latin translation of De symptomatum differentiis.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS
  • 27

Librorum pars prima [-quinta] … 5 vols.

Venice: in aedibus Aldi et Andreae Asulani Soceri, 1525.

Greek editio princeps of Galen's complete works in Greek, edited by the Paduan professor G. B. Oppizzoni [Opizo] with the help of John Clement , Edward Wotton, William Rose (ca. 1490-1525), and Thomas Lupset, all Engishmen and followers of Thomas Linacre, and the Saxon Georg Agricola of De re metallica fame. The work was published by Andrea Torresano, a printer who operated the Aldine press for Aldus's sons, who were then too young to run the press.

A Greek physician working in Rome, Galen's many writings in Greek dominated Byzantine, Arabic, medieval and even Renaissance medicine for over a millenium, being superseded in anatomy only with Vesalius, in physiology with Harvey, and in pathology with Boerhaave. The surviving writings of Galen also represent 25% of all that remains of ancient Greek literature.

Issuing this set in one year must have been an absolutely immense challenge for the publisher. The first volume was devoted to Galen's writings on physiology and anatomy, the second to pharmacology, the third to diagnostic, prognostic and "internistic" treatises, the fourth to therapy and hygiene, and the fifth to comments on Hippocratic texts.  For more information see HistoryofInformation.com at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographical Classics, Collected Works: Opera Omnia
  • 6815

Peri ton idion biblion [Latin: De Libris propriis liber, On his own writings] and Peri tes taxeos ton idion biblion [Latin: De ordine librorum suorum liber, On the arrangement of his own writings]. IN: Galeni librorum pars prima-quinta, Part IV.

Venice: Andrea Torresani di Asolo (Andreas Asulanus), 1525.

The extent of Claudius Galen's written work was so great that Galen himself felt the need to provide a bibliography organizing and explaining his own writings. He also felt the need to distinguish between works that he had actually written and works that were being falsely attributed to him. About 190 CE  Galen wrote two classified bibliographies of his own writings: Peri ton idion biblion [Latin: De Libris propriis liber, On his own writings] and Peri tes taxeos ton idion biblion [Latin: De ordine librorum suorum liber, On the arrangement of his own writings]. These are the first auto-bibliographical works which survived, and they may also be considered the first bibliographies of any kind which survived after the listings from the library of Alexandria by Kallimachos (Callimachus), which survived only in the most fragmentary form.

"The De libris propriis liber opens with a general introduction, in which Galen refers to the books falsely attributed to him. The main text is divided into seventeen chapters, in which Galen arranges his works under such headings as commentaries, anatomical works, Hippocratic writings, works on moral philosophy, grammar and rhetoric, and so on. This bibliography apparently did not suffice as a guide to the five hundred or so works Galen had put out (many of them now lost), for he added a second one. This is the De ordine librorum suorum liber, of which second bibliography unfortunately only a fragment has come down to us" (Besterman, The Beginnings of Systematic Bibliography 2nd ed (1940) 3, nos. I & II).

Galen's bibliographies were first published in print in Part IV, ff.**1-6, of the editio princeps of his collected writings in Greek issued by the heirs of Aldus Manutius and Aldus's father-in-law, Andreas Asulanus, in Venice in 1525. They were revised and improved by Conrad Gessner for an edition published in Basel in 1562.

 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographical Classics, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors
  • 13148

Claudii Galeni ... Liber de plenitudine. Polybus De salubri victus ratione privatorum. Guinterio Ioanne Andernaco interprete. Apuleius Platonicus De herbarum virtutibus. Antonii Benivenii Libellus de abditis nonnullis ac mirandis morboru & sanitationum causis.

Paris: Christian Wechel, 1528.

First separate edition of Galen's Liber de plenitudine and Polybus's De salubri victus ratione privatorum, edited by Johan Guinter von Andernach. Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PATHOLOGY
  • 9349

Galeni Pergameni libri anatomici, quorum indicem versa patina indicabit. Edited by Giacomo Berengario da Carpi.

Bologna: Giovanni Baptista Phaelli, 1529.

First printed edition in Latin of Galen's De anatomicis administrationis, as translated from the Greek by Demetrios Chalkokondyles under the title De anatomicis aggressionibus. Other works in this collection edited by Berengario da Carpi are De motu musculorum translated by Niccolò Leoniceno, De arteriarum et venarum dissectione and De nervorum dissectione translated by Andrea Fortolo, and De hirundinibus, etc. translated by Ferdinando Balamio Siculo. Digital facsimile from Biusante.parisdescartes.fr at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 16th Century, ANATOMY › Ancient Anatomy (BCE to 5th Century CE), ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 11083

De compositione medicamentorum... lib VII per Ioannem Guinterium Andernacum imprimum latinitate donati. Eiusdem De ponderibus & mensuris liber, D. Andrea Alciato interprete.

Basel : Andreas Cratander, 1530.

First separate edition in Latin of Galen's De compositione medicamentorum, On the Composition of medicines, translated by Johann Winter of Andernach, to which was added Galen's treatise on weights and measures translated by humanist Andrea Alciato. 

Durling cites another edition of Guinter's translation published in Paris by Simon de Colines, also in 1530.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BOTANY › Medical Botany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS
  • 359

De anatomicis administrationibus libri novem.

Paris: apud Simonem Colinaeum, 1531.

First separate printed edition in Latin, translated by Johann Guinter von Andernach, of Galen's dissection manual, in which Galen both described his dissection techniques and described anatomical details that were previously unknown. Guinter was able to translate the first eight and one-half books, which survived in Greek, of Galen's original text which was written in 15 books. For the remaining portions of this work, which survived in Arabic, and were unknown in the 16th century, see Simon's edition, No. 360. Some authorities date Colines's edition as 1532. Guinter's translation also appeared in Basel from the press of Andreas Cratander in 1531 with Guinter's translations of 3 other works by Galen as Claudii Galeni Pergameni De anatomicis administrationibus libri novem ; De constitutione artis medicae liber ; De Theriaca, ad Pisonem commentariolus ; De pulsibus, ad medicinae candidatos liber. Digital facsimile of the Cratander edition from Google Books at this link.

Galen’s anatomical writings are a repository of all contemporary knowledge, together with some of his own views and discoveries. He had a good knowledge of osteology and myology, some knowledge of angiology and less of zoology. Although not to be regarded as the founder of the science of anatomy, he is nevertheless its first important witness. English translation: On anatomical procedures. De anatomicis administrationibus. Translation of the surviving books with introduction and notes by Charles Singer (1956). See also De anatomicis administrationibus, libri i-ix. In Galen's Opera omnia ed. cur. C. G. KÜHN, 2 (1821) 215-731.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 16th Century, ANATOMY › Ancient Anatomy (BCE to 5th Century CE), ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, COMPARATIVE ANATOMY
  • 10961

De medicamentis empiricis physicis ac rationalibus liber.... Edited by Janus Cornarius. Item Claudii Galeni libri novem nunc primum Latini facti.... Jani Cornarii.

Basel: Hieronymus Froben, 1536.

The Gallo-Roman physician Marcellus was born in Bordeaux. He may have served as magister officiorum under Theodosius I, or may have been royal physician. Sarton (Introduction to the history of science I, 391) considered his work "an extrordinary mixture of traditional knowledge, popular (Celtic) medicine, and rank superstition. Interesting also for the historian of botany because of the great number of plants mentioned."

For this edition "Cornarius worked from a manuscript written in the mid-9th century that was superior to the one used for the Teubner edition of 1889 but which was thought to have been lost; it was rediscovered in 1913 and used for the 1916 edition of Marcellus published in Teubner's Corpus Medicorum Latinorum series. Referred to as the Codex Parisinus, it contains Cornarius's corrections and marginal notes" (Wikipedia article on Janus Cornarius).

The writings by Galen in this edition are: De causis respirationis liber 1, De utilitate respirationis, liber 1, De difficultate respirations libri III, De uteri dissectione liber 1, De foetus formatione liber 1, De semine libri II.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, EMBRYOLOGY, Magic & Superstition in Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, RESPIRATION
  • 11748

De palpitationes, tremore, rigore, convulsione. Intreprete Nicolao Lauachio, medico Florentino.

Florence: Aurelius Pincius, 1536.

First separately published printed edition of Galen's writings on neuropathology. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, NEUROLOGY › Diseases of the Nervous System
  • 9091

Guenter von Andernach: Institutionum anatomicarum secundum Galeni sententiam ad candidatos medicinae libri quatuor per Joannem Guinterium Andernacum medicum ab Andrea Vesalio Bruxellensi auctiores & emendatiores redditi.

Venice: D. Bernardinus, 1538.

Shortly after the publication of Tabulae anatomicae sex, Vesalius completed this revision of Institutiones anatomicae, a Galenic anatomical text by his teacher Johann Guinter first published in 1536. Vesalius justified his new edition by citing the numerous typographical errors in the original; however, he also incorporated much new material detailing the minutiae of dissection and offering several independent anatomical judgments. These included the anti-Galenic observation that the cardiac systole is synchronous with the arterial pulse, an observation he would discuss again in his venesection epistle.

This work was edited with an English translation, and notes from Vesalius's own copy, by Vivian Nutton, in 2017. See No. 9092.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 16th Century
  • 12787

Stephani Atheniensis philosophi explanationes in Galeni priorem librum therapeuticum ad Glauconem, Augustino Gadaldino Mutiensi interprete.

Venice: apud Juntas, 1554.

Agostino Gadaldini’s Latin translation of Galen’s Ad Glauconem and of Stephanus’ commentary upon it, enhanced with his own scholia. The work was at the heart of the medical curriculum at Alexandria, and the sixth/seventh-century Alexandrian physician Stephanus naturally made it the subject of a commentary (his commentaries on the Prognostics and Aphorisms of Hippocrates also survive). Gadaldini of Modena produced this Latin edition from a Greek manuscript now in the Royal Library of Copenhagen. This was the first printed edition of any work by Stephanus of Athens.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BYZANTINE MEDICINE
  • 6814

Prologomena in Galenum, in tres partes divisa IN: volume one of Cl [audius]Galen Pergameni [Opera] Omnia quae extant, in Latinum sermonem convers.

Basel: Hieronymus Froben & Nicolaus Episcopius, 1562.

Prologomena in Galenum, in tres partes divisa written by physician, naturalist, and bibliographer, Conrad Gessner (Gesner), and issued in volume one of Cl [audius] Galeni Pergameni  [Opera] Omnia, quae extant, in Latinum sermonem convers published in Basel by Hieronymus Froben and Nicolaus Episcopius in 1562, was the first bio-bibliography. Gessner's study, which covered Greek editions, Latin editions, lost works, writers on Galen and a classified bibliography of Galen's writings, was also Gessner's most developed bibliography. The bio-bibliography occupies 37 unnumbered leaves, following the title to volume 1, and Gesner's two unnumbered leaves of dedication, dated February 1562. (α†4-6,β†6, γ†6, A†-C†6, D†4). To the extent that this is a bio-bibliography we might call it an early partial biography, in that it incorporates what little is known of Galen's life.

Besterman, Beginnings of Systematic Bibliography 2nd ed (1940) 19-20, no. XXIX.

 



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographical Classics, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors, BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals
  • 28

Opera omnia. 20 vols., [in 22].

Leipzig: C. Cnobloch, 18211833.

This Greek–Latin edition, edited by C. G. Kühn, is reprinted from much earlier editions, and leaves much to be desired with respect to scholarship. However, it remained the standard edition for about 100 years.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, Collected Works: Opera Omnia
  • 2606

De tumoribus praeter naturam. In his Opera omnia, ed. cur. C.G. Kühn. 7, 705-32.

Leipzig: C. Cnobloch, 1824.

Galen’s classification of tumors persisted for more than 1,000 years. He considered neoplasms to be due to an excess of black bile, which solidified in certain sites. He advocated purges to dissolve the black bile, and if these were unsuccessful, the knife. He was not familiar with internal tumors. Critical edition and English translation by J. Reedy, Diss, (not published,) University of Michigan, 1968.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, ONCOLOGY & CANCER
  • 4511

De tremore, palpitatione, convulsione, et rigore. IN: Opera omnia ed. cur. C.G. Kühn, cur 7, 584-642.

Leipzig: C. Cnobloch, 1824.

Complete English translation by D. Sider and M. McVaugh in Trans. stud. Coll. Phys. Phila., 1979, 1, 183-210.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, NEUROLOGY › Diseases of the Nervous System
  • 148

Galeni De temperamentis libri III recensuit Georgius Helmreich.

Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1904.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, ANTHROPOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY
  • 360

Sieben Bücher Anatomie des Galen: ... zum ersten Male veröffentlicht nach den Handschriften einer arabischen Übersetzung des 9. Jahrh. n. Chr. / ins Deutsche Übertragen und Kommentiert von Max Simon. 2 vols.

Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs, 1906.

First printed edition of the final six and one-half books (the second half of book 9, and books 10-15) of Galen's De anatomicis administrationibus, which were lost in the Greek original. In 1714 the Bodleian Library acquired a 9th century Arabic version of the complete work in 15 books, and in 1860 the British Museum received another. From these manuscripts Max Simon published an Arabic text (vol. 1) with German translation (vol. 2). English translation of Simon’s German text: Galen on anatomical procedures. The later books. A translation by the late W.L.H. Duckworth. Edited [and compared with the Arabic] by M. C. Lyons and B. Travers, Cambridge: Univ. Press, 1962. Digital facsimile of Simon's 1906 edition from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Ancient Anatomy (BCE to 5th Century CE), ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, COMPARATIVE ANATOMY
  • 570

De usu partium libri XVII ad codicum fidem recensuit Georgius Helmreich. 2 vols.

Leipzig : B. G. Teubner, 19071909.

First separate edition, edited from the prior printed editions and the surviving early manuscripts, of Galen's treatise on the function, use and purpose of the individual parts of the body. In this treatise Galen explained the value of anatomical understanding of the human body in a way that was accessible to non-physicians. For the English translation see May (1968). Digital facsimile of the 1907-09 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PHYSIOLOGY
  • 29

[Opera omnia]. Corpus Medicorum Graecorum V ...

Leipzig & Berlin: B. G. Teubner / Akademie-Verlag, 1914.

As of 1990 about twenty volumes containing perhaps a fifth of the Corpus were published. Although the principles of the edition varied somewhat over the 75 year course of the project, all volumes represent a decisive advance over Kühn (No. 28). Important treatises accompanied by English translations include: Galen on the Doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato, edited and translated by Phillip De Lacy, C.M.G. V, 4, 1, 2, 3 vols., 1978-84. Galen on Prognosis, edited and translated by Vivian Nutton, C.M.G. V, 8, 1, 1979. Galen on examinations by which the best physicians are recognized, edited in Arabic and translated by Albert Iskandar, C.M.G. Supplementum Orientale IV, 1988.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, Collected Works: Opera Omnia
  • 1985

De sanitate tuenda ed. K. Koch. Corpus Medicorum Graecorum V, 4, 2, 1-198

Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1914.

English translation by R. M. Green, Springfield, Ill., 1951.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PHYSICAL MEDICINE / REHABILITATION › Physical Therapy, THERAPEUTICS › Hydrotherapy
  • 569

On the natural faculties. With an English translation by Arthur John Brock.

London: William Heinemann, 1916.

Greek-English edition in the Loeb Classical Library. This was one of the first, if not the actual first, modern English translations of Galen. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PHYSIOLOGY
  • 6831

Hunain ibn Ishaq über die syrischen und arabischen Galen-Übersetzungen zum ersten mal Herausgegeben und Überzetzt von G. Bergsträsser.

Abhandlungen für die Kunde des Morgenlandes, 17, No. 2, 1925.

Various writings of Galen survived through Arabic and Syriac translations rather than the original Greek. In the ninth century the Assyrian Christian physician and translator into Arabic and Syriac Hunain ibn Ishaq (Abu Zayd Hunayn ibn Ishaq al-Ibadi), compiled a bibliography of his translations into Arabic. Hunain ibn Ishaq also wrote a letter to one of his patrons discussing his translation process. In February 2015 the Al-Islam.org website stated that Hunain, who was known as Johannitius Onan to Latin readers, "translated 95 works of Galen from Greek to Syriac and 99 into Arabic." This would represented a significant percentage of Galen's output. In 1925 G. Bergsträsser published the Arabic text of Hunain ibn Ishaq's bibliographical work from a manuscript he found in Constantinople. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic
  • 12671

Neue Materialen zu Hunain Ibn Ishâk’s Galen-Bibliographie. Abhandlungen für die Kunde des Morgenlandes 19.2.

Leipzig: Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft, 1932.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts
  • 4963.1

Galen: De propriorum animi cuiuslibet affectuum dignotione et curatione. De animi cuius libet peccatorum dignotione et curatione ed. W. De Boer. Corpus Medicorum Graecorum V, 4, 1, 1, pp. 1-68.

Leipzig & Berlin: B. G. Teubner, 1937.

English translation by P.W. Harkins, Galen on the passions and errors of the soul. Columbus, Ohio, 1963.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PSYCHOLOGY
  • 2189

Galen on medical experience. First edition of the Arabic version with English translation and notes, by R. Walzer.

London: Oxford University Press, 1944.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 9093

A translation of Galen's Hygiene (De santiate tuenda) by Robert Montraville Green, with an introduction by Henry E. Sigerist.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1951.

First translation into a modern language.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 8421

A chronological census of Renaissance editions and translations of Galen.

J. Warburg & Courtaud Inst., 24, 230-305., 1961.

Digital facsimile from Jstor at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors, Renaissance Medicine › History of Renaissance Medicine
  • 9437

Galen's Institutio logica. English translation, introduction and commentary by John Spangler Kieffer.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1964.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 9097

Galen on the usefulness of the parts of the body. De usu partium. Translated from the Greek with an introduction and commentary by Margaret Tallmadge May. 2 vols.

Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1968.


Subjects: ANATOMY › Ancient Anatomy (BCE to 5th Century CE), ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PHYSIOLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 9129

Galen's system of physiology and medicine. An analysis of his doctrines and observations on blood flow, respiration, humors and internal diseases.

Basel: Karger, 1968.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, PHYSIOLOGY › History of Physiology
  • 9128

Galen on sense perception: His doctrines, observations and experiments on vision, hearing, smell, touch and pain, and their historical sources.

Basel: Karger, 1970.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, PSYCHOLOGY › Sensation / Perception
  • 8236

Galen on the affected parts. Translated by Rudolph E. Siegel.

New York: Karger, 1976.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 8440

Galenus Latinus Vol. 1. Burgundio of Pisa's Translation of Galen's Περί Κράσεων "De complexionibus". Edited by Richard J. Durling.

Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 19761992.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy
  • 9124

Galen on language and ambiguity. An English transltion of Galen's De captionibus (On fallacies), with introduction, text and commentary by R. B. Edlow.

Leiden: Brill, 1977.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 9126

Galen: On prognosis: Text, translation, commentary by Vivian Nutton. CMG V.8.1.

Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1979.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 8437

Lectures on Galen's De sectis. (Arethusa Monographs, VIII). Department of Classics, State University of New York at Buffalo.

Buffalo, NY: Department of Classics, 1981.

English translation of this commentary on Galen's De sectis (On sects) given by the iatrosophist and commentator on medical texts, Agnellus, circa 600 CE.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE
  • 9123

Galen: On the doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato. Edition, translation and commentary by Phillip DeLacy. 3 vols.

Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 19811984.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 8436

Iohannis Alexandrini Commentaria in librum De sectis Galeni. Edited by C. D. Pritchet.

Leiden: Brill, 1982.

Edited from the Latin translation by Burgundio of the Greek text first published in the 1490 edition of Galen's works.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE
  • 2663

Galen on respiration and the arteries. An edition with English translation and commentary of De usu respirationis, An in arteriis natura sanguis contineatur, De usu pulsuum, and De causis respirationis, by David J. Furley and J. S. Wilkie.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1984.

Galen's system of medicine based on the minutiae of pulse variations persisted into the 18th century.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS
  • 8235

Galen on bloodletting: A study of the origins, development and validity of his opinions, with a translation of the three works. By Peter Brain.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1986.

Bloodletting is thought to have been practiced by Greek physicians of the 5th century BCE. This study includes translation of Galeni de venae sectione adversus Erasistratum liber (162-163 CE), Galeni de venae sectione adversus Erasistateos Romae degenentes (175? CE), and Galeni de curandi ratione per venae sectionem (193-194 CE).



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, THERAPEUTICS › Bloodletting, THERAPEUTICS › History of Therapeutics
  • 9096

Galen on the therapeutic method. Books I and II. Translated with an introduction and commentary by R. J. Hankinson.

Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991.

First translation into a modern language of Books ! and II of De methodo medendi.  Very extensive introduction, commentary and bibliography.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE
  • 8441

Galenus Latinus II: Burgundio of Pisa's translation of Galen 's ΠEPI TΩN ΠEΠONΘΩN TOΠΩN, "De interioribus." Edited with introduction and indices by R. J. Durling. 2 vols.

Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 1992.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy
  • 9963

A dictionary of medical terms in Galen.

Leiden, 1993.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, Dictionaries, Biomedical
  • 8225

Corpus Galenicum: Verzeichnis der galenischen und pseudogalenischen Schriften.

Tübingen: Institut für Geschichte der Medizin, 1997.

Revised edition 12/2012 is available online at this link: http://cmg.bbaw.de/online-publications/Galen-Bibliographie_2012_08_28.pdf



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY , BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Online Access Catalogues & Bibliographic Databases
  • 9609

Galen on pharmacology: Philosophy, history and medicine. Proceedings of the Vth International Galen Colloquium, Lille, 16-18 March 1995. Edited by Armelle Debru.

Leiden: Brill, 1997.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica
  • 9125

Galen on antecedent causes. Introduction, text, translation and commentary by R. J. Hankinson.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1998.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 11253

Stephanus the philosopher and physician: Commentary on Galen's Therapeutics to Glaucon. By Keith M. Dickson.

Leiden & Boston: Brill, 1998.

"An edition of the Commentary by Stephanus of Athens, the seventh-century physician and philosopher, on Book One of Galen's Therapeutics to Glaucon. It comprises introduction, Greek text with critical apparatus and index of sources, English translation, notes, bibliography, and index. As one of the few medical texts to date from this period, and one of the most detailed and complete,  the commentary sheds important light on the nature and extent of medical education in the West, on the eve of the Arab conquest" (publisher).



Subjects: BYZANTINE MEDICINE, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession
  • 9127

Galen. On my own opinions. Galeni De propriis placitis. Edition, introduction and translation by Vivian Nutton. CMG 5.3.2.

Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1999.

De propriis placitis is Galen's final work in which he reflected on some of the fundamental medical problems that occupied him throughout his long career. "This treatise is not quite the comprehensive survey of a lifetime's work that the title might lead one to expect; in fact, it is surprisingly disorganized and hardly useful as a clinical guide. It is rather more accurately seen as a work about epistemology and medical methodology, in which Galen considers what aspects of medicine are knowable or not and how one formulates principles in the face of our inconsistent knowledge of the body and, indeed, of the world" (http://repository.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1018&context=classics_papers, accessed 02-2017).



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 8231

The unknown Galen. Edited by Vivian Nutton.

London: Institute of Classical Studies... University of London, 2002.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire
  • 10758

On the properties of foodstuffs (De alimentorum facultatibus). Introduction, translation and commentary by Owen Powell.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2003.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, NUTRITION / DIET
  • 12170

Agnellus de Ravenne. Lectures galéniques: le «De pulsibus ad tirones». Introduction, texte latin (adiuuante Ivan Garofalo), traduction française, notes explicatives, bibliographie et index par Nicoletta Palmieri, «Mémoires XXVIII du Centre Jean Palerne».

Saint-Etienne, 2005.


Subjects: BYZANTINE MEDICINE
  • 9614

Galen: On diseases and symptoms. Edited and translated by Ian Johnston.

Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 11082

Shock and awe: The performance dimension of Galen's anatomy demonstrations. (Version 5; January 2007.)

Princeton/Stanford Working Papers in Classics, 2007.

Digital edition available from princeton.edu at this link: http://www.princeton.edu/~pswpc/pdfs/gleason/010702.pdf



Subjects: ANATOMY › Ancient Anatomy (BCE to 5th Century CE), ANATOMY › History of Anatomy, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10075

Galen and the world of knowledge. Edited by Christopher Gill, Tim Whitmarsh and John Wilkins.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Among the numerous essays in this volume are those by Vivian Nutton on Galen's Library and on Galen's bibiography of his own writings by Jason König.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Physicians' / Scientists' Libraries
  • 9081

Galen: On the anomalous dyskrasia (De inaequali intemperie). Editio maior. Edition, translation and commentary by Elsa Garcia Novo.

Madrid: Editorial Complutense, 2011.

First critical edition and translation of this text by Galen which became a bestseller in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (translations into Syrian, Arabic, Latin 8 versions and Hebrew; 14 commentaries from 1290 to 1567). 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE
  • 9314

Galen, De diebus decretoriis, from Greek into Arabic. A critical edition, with translation and commentary of Hunayn ibn Ishāq, Kitāb ayyām al-buhrān, by Glen M. Cooper.

New York: Routledge, 2011.

First printed edition of Hunayn ibn Ishaq's Arabic translation of Galen's Critical Days (De diebus decretoriis), a founding text of astrological medicine, together with the first translation of the text into a modern language.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Medical Astrology, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 9611

Galen: Method of medicine. Books 1-4, Books 5-9, Books 10-14. Edited and translated by Ian Johnston and G. H. R. Horsley. 3 vols.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 8257

Galen: On problematical movements. Edited with introduction and commentary by Vivian Nutton, with an edition of the Arabic version by Gerrit Bos.

Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, Neurophysiology, PHYSIOLOGY
  • 12826

Latin editions of Galen's Opera omnia (1490-1625) and their prefaces.

Early Science and Medicine, 17, 391-412, 2012.

Analysis of publishing and editorial aspects of the many editions of Galen's collected works published during the height of Galen's influence after the invention of printing. This filled a gap in Galenic bibliography since Richard Durling did not cover most of these editions in his Chronological census (1961).



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors
  • 7691

Galen's psychological writings: Avoiding distress, Character traits, The diagnosis and treatment of the affections and errors peculiar to each person's soul, The capacites of the soul depend upon the mixtures of the body. Edited by P. N. Singer. Translated with introductions and notes by Vivian Nutton, Daniel Davies and P. N. Singer.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

In 2005 a long lost treatise by Galen, entitled Περι αλυπιας (Avoiding distress), was discovered in the Monastery of the Vlatades (Moni Vlatadon) in Thessaloniki, central Macedonia, Greece. The manuscript, identified as Vlatadon 14, dates from the fifteenth century. In Peri ton idion biblio (De Libris propriis liberOn his Own Writings), Galen referred to Περι αλυπιας, but the last evidence of the text was preserved by the 13th century physician and writer Joseph ben Judah ibn Aknin, who paraphrased and/or translated extacts of it into Hebrew. Rediscovery of the complete text is considered one of the most spectacular finds ever in ancient literature.

Galen was motivated to write Περι αλυπιας in 192 CE after a large portion of his library, his supply of medicines and medical instruments, and wax molds for the casting of new instruments that he had invented, and other valuable items, were destroyed when a devastating fire burned the Temple of Peace (Forum of Vespasian) and nearby storehouses on the Via Sacra, the main street of ancient Rome, where his property was kept. Galen chose to keep his library there because the storehouse also held some of the imperial archives, and was kept under military guard. The fire that destroyed Galen's library also burned all the public libraries on the Palatine Hill.

Galen's Περι αλυπιας provides significant information on the use of the codex form of the book in the second century CE, on the general vulnerability of books and texts, and on the production, copying, dissemination and storage of information, including the operation of Rome's imperial public libraries and Galen's use of them. It also provides information on the "consolation genre" of writings in antiquity. For the 2013 edition Galen's Avoiding distress was edited and translated by Vivian Nutton. For further details see HistoryofInformation.com at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Physicians' / Scientists' Libraries, PSYCHOLOGY
  • 8291

The Alexandrian summaries of Galen’s On critical days. Editions and translations of the two versions of the JAWĀMIʿ, with an introduction and notes by Gerrit Bos and Y. Tzvi Langermann.

Leiden: Brill, 2015.

"Galen's impact on Islamic civilization, mainly on medicine but also on physics and philosophy, was enormous. His most important books were mediated through "summaries" which not only shortened, but in some cases also revised Galenic teachings. Several versions of these summaries exist, and their appreciation is critical for a proper understanding of the development of medieval science. This book presents the first editions, translations, and studies of the remaining summaries to On Critical Days. In Galenic theory, fevers develop towards a crisis which will determine the fate of a patient" (publisher).



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Hellenistic, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 8233

Hunayn ibn Ishāq on his Galen translations: A parallel English-Arabic text edited and translated by John C. Lamoreaux, with an appendix by Grigory Kessel.

Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2016.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 9610

Galen: On the constitution of the art of medicine. The art of medicine. A method of medicine to Glaucon. Edited and translated by Ian Johnston.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 8573

GALENO: Catalogo delle Traduzioni Latine.

2017.

http://www.galenolatino.com/index.php?id=2&clean=1

This electronic bibliography covers Latin translations of Galen (129-216) and the pseudo-Galen from Greek, Arabic and Hebrew, produced from the sixth to the seventeenth century, including the pseudo-Galenic works in Latin. It also provides information on these texts and their authors, as well as the description of the text manuscripts beginning in the eighth century, and printed editions starting in 1473. 
 
"Galen (129-216) has had a great importance in the history of medicine and science from late antiquity to the nineteenth century., And the West has been read, studied and commented mainly in Latin. His numerous works have been translated into Latin from the V-VI sec. and again translated back to the XVII century, when they were included in the curriculum of medical schools in Europe. 
 
"Hermann Diels, as part of a 'project Akademie der Wissenschften Berlin, published in 1905-7 catalog of manuscripts of Greek physicians, Galen including that for the Latin part is largely incomplete and unsatisfactory. Richard Durling (1932-1999), from the late fifties, has worked on the Latin tradition of Galen publishing the census of printed editions from 1473 to 1599 in the Journal of the Warburg and Courtald Institutes of 1961, and two articles on Latin manuscripts that correct and integrate the Diels, both in Traditio , one in 1967 and another in 1981. He also collected observations of about six hundred Latin manuscripts of Galen, using microfilms from libraries around the world - now preserved at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, United States - in view of the publication of a volume in the series Catalogus Translationum et Commentariorum , which, however, was not brought to completion. After his death on June 5, 1999, this material has been entrusted by Sheila widow Stefania Luckily, together with Anna Maria Raia, he has reviewed a part and has published in the volume of Traditio 2006, in a third article corrects and integrates the Diels. 
 
"The electronic catalog of the Latin translations of Galen was born with the aim, first and foremost, to make available to scholars Richard Durling material on Latin manuscripts of Galen and the pseudo-Galen remained unpublished and, at the same time, to report and make easily accessible the rich philological work done on the Latin editions of Galen during the sixteenth century, even with collations of Greek manuscripts. 
 
" [This catalogue] is is divided into five tabs - works, translations, manuscripts, editions, translations - which are connected to each other and providing information and specific descriptions, with appropriate bibliographical references and, if any, in the case of manuscripts and editions, reproductions accessed over the network. 

"Filters are also available for the various tabs that allow you to do targeted searches within the planned fields" (http://www.galenolatino.com/index.php?id=16&clean=1,  accessed 01-2017).
 
(Without information regarding the origination of this electronic resource I assigned 2017 when I entered it into this database.)


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Online Access Catalogues & Bibliographic Databases
  • 9613

GALEN: Hygiene. Books 1-4, Books 5-6. Thrasybulus on exercise with a small ball. Edited and translated by Ian Johnston. 2 vols.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2018.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, Hygiene, PHYSICAL MEDICINE / REHABILITATION › Exercise / Training / Fitness
  • 11080

Brill's companion to the reception of Galen. Edited by Petros Bouras-Vallianatos and Barbara Zipser.

Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2019.

This collective work shows how Galen was adopted, adapted, admired, contested, and criticized across diverse intellectual environments and geographical regions, from Late Antiquity to the present day, and from Europe to North Africa, the Middle and the Far East. 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, BYZANTINE MEDICINE › History of Byzantine Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 13497

Galen: A thinking doctor in Imperial Rome. By Vivian Nutton.

Abingdon, Oxford & New York: Routledge, 2020.

A very readable and relatively brief, but comprehensive, biography. The appendix provides a complete list of Galen's works with their titles in Latin, also in English translation, correlated to the best editions and translations of each text.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works)